A rare local, solo

October 15, 2016

All too quickly, a month had passed since my last flight, and an upcoming week away meant that two weekends were spoken for and unavailable for flying. Mindful of running out of currency, I booked an aircraft for the Sunday to try to get some flying done. In the days leading up to the flight, the weather forecast looked pretty grim, so the flight was rescheduled to the Saturday afternoon. A haircut appointment meant that the full day wasn’t available, so I had to make do with a short flight mid-afternoon.

I’d spoken to Josh recently, about taking him for another flight with his Grandmother, and she’d expressed an interest to fly over Weston-super-Mare. Today seemed an ideal opportunity to do a dummy run of some of that flight, requesting a Zone Transit of Bristol’s airspace down the English coast of the Bristol Channel. The forecast looked good for the flight, with some forecast poor weather on the way towards late afternoon. Knowing that I was only planning a quick local flight and heading into the forecast weather, I was happy to make the flight on the grounds that if I ended up in poor conditions I could just reverse my route to return to Kemble.

After completing the planning in the morning, I arrived at Kemble in the early afternoon after eating a light lunch on the way. Despite the current good conditions Kemble was fairly quiet, and I completed the paperwork in the Club’s office before checking out the aircraft and getting ready to leave. There were no issues during the walkaround, and I made sure to check fuel levels and take samples as this was the first flight of the day. For a change the Arrow’s engine started first time, and I was cleared to taxy to hold A1 for my checks. Another aircraft arrived behind me just as I completed the power checks, and on announcing ready I was cleared onto the runway to depart.

The first leg was direct from Kemble to the Severn Bridges, which was almost directly on runway heading when departing on Runway 26. I jinked left slightly to avoid some small built up areas as I climbed out, and climbed to around 3500 feet on the first leg. Once clear of Kemble I got the aircraft set up for the cruise, before contacting Bristol to request a Basic Service and Zone Transit. The Controller gave me a Basic Service and a squawk initially, asking me to report at the Severn Bridges. The frequency was fairly quiet, with just a commercial aircraft inbound to Bristol, and then the other aircraft that had just departed Kemble who was flying a similar route to me, but planning to fly below Bristol’s airspace.

Approaching the River Severn

Approaching the River Severn

The bridges were easy to spot from a distance, and as I approached them I contacted the Controller to inform him I was heading South West towards Bridgewater, following the coast and descending to 2500 feet. I was told to ‘remain outside Controlled airspace until cleared’, and continued on towards Avonmouth and Clevedon. As I passed under the first part of the CTA (that started at 4000 feet) the Controller came back on frequency, and when he started with ‘Due to Bristol inbound and departing aircraft…’ I was expecting to be refused the Transit, and prepared to descend to 1250 feet to pass beneath the airspace. However, he continued ‘cleared Transit of Bristol Controlled Airspace, not above 2000 feet, routing down the coast’. I continued my descent down to 1900 feet, making a note of my clearance so that every time I looked down I would see my cleared height!

Passing Avonmouth

Passing Avonmouth

As I continued South West and then South down the coast, I passed by Portishead, Cleveland and then Weston-super-Mare. The further South I travelled the worse the visibility got, and I passed through some light rain showers on the way. Behind me the weather was still clear, so I was happy to continue knowing that I always had the option or reversing my route.

The pier at Weston-super-Mare

The pier at Weston-super-Mare

Deteriorating visibility to the South

Deteriorating visibility to the South

After 20 minutes or so I approached Bridgewater, and informed the Controller I was turning towards Frome, climbing (hopefully!) up to 3500 feet to get out of what I hoped was just some low-level murk. The Controller asked me to report at Frome, and as I continued on the leg the skies ahead became noticeably lighter. It wasn’t long before I was back in clear skies, and on reaching Frome I reported my position to the Bristol Controller, requesting a frequency change back to Kemble in readiness for the arrival.

Conditions much better to the East

Conditions much better to the East

I set course for Lyneham, and on this leg got a good view of a White Horse off to my right, and Colerne off to my left, with the River Severn clearly visible in the distance. I passed just to the South of Lyneham, enabling me to get a nice photograph of the airfield off to my left, showing the expanse of solar panels to the North of the main runway, as well as showing that all of the runways still appeared to be in good condition.

White Horse off to the right

White Horse off to the right

Colerne with the River Severn in the distance

Colerne with the River Severn in the distance

Former RAF Lyneham

Former RAF Lyneham

Turning North from Lyneham, I contacted Kemble to find they were now operating off runway 08, with no other aircraft on frequency. I asked the FISO for permission to carry out some circuits (it seemed a good opportunity to carry out 3 takeoffs and landings to fully reset my passenger currency). These were granted, and to make things even easier I was offered a Downwind Join, which I happily accepted. I passed just South West of Oaksey Park, before trying to judge the appropriate point to turn left and join the Downwind leg of the circuit.

I carried out the before-landing checks as normal, and came quite close to lowering the flaps while exceeding the flap limiting speeds. Normally this isn’t a factor, as I would have slowed down on the Deadside Descent, ensuring that the remainder of the circuit was flown well within the limit for lowering the flaps. This time however I was still slowing down on the Downwind leg, and luckily checked my airspeed as I reached for the flap lever to automatically lower them as I made ready to turn Base.

Another aircraft was approaching the circuit as I turned, aiming to also join Downwind. I continued on to Final, getting lined up nicely despite the almost 90 degree crosswind from the South. I was a little late lowering the final stage of flap (at least the Reds, Blues, Greens, Flaps check worked!) and my first landing of the day was a little firm and flat as I battled some turbulence down near the runway. I cleaned up the aircraft, before applying full power again and taking off for another try. The other two circuits were unremarkable, but the tracks flown were very consistent (if perhaps a little wide, although I think that the noise abatement circuit means that this was probably actually correct). Similarly, both landings were nothing special, perfectly safe but a little firmer than I would have liked.

After the final landing, I asked the FISO to taxy to Hotel site where the Lyneham aircraft are parked. I was somewhat surprised when he asked me to come to a stop on the runway, fearing that he may have spotted some kind of aircraft issue that I was unaware of. However it was just the fact that one of the airfield Fire Engines was waiting to cross the runway onto the Charlie taxyway, meaning he was blocking the taxyway I wanted to take to get back to parking. I came to a stop, allowing him to cross, before vacating at Alpha and taxying back to the parking area. I carried out the shutdown checks, before positioning the aircraft at the bowser in readiness for refuelling.

As I prepared the bowser and extended the fuel hose, I was horrified to learn that the fuel cap on the left wing wasn’t seated correctly, and only one of the retaining lugs was correctly engaged (you can clearly see this in the Avonmouth photograph above). Somehow, during the ‘A’ check, I had failed to correctly replace the cap after carrying out the final fuel drain check (pouring the drained fuel back into the fuel tank in the left wing). This could have had potentially serious consequences if the cap had become dislodged during flight, not least that it would have meant having to source a replacement fuel cap!

I think this is probably the most serious pre-flight check failure I’ve had since I started flying. As ever, it was a clear reminder how important it is to carry out a thorough pre-flight inspection. Most infuriating was the fact that this was actually a ‘fault’ that I had caused myself, purely due to a small slip in not replacing the fuel cap correctly after checking levels and fuel quality. Slightly shocked, I completed refuelling the aircraft before pushing it back into its parking space and securing it. Just to twist the knife in one final wrinkle, I made it back to the car on my way to the office before realising that I hadn’t made a note of the final tacho reading, so had to go back to the aircraft, partially remove the cover and make a note of the reading! I headed into the Club to complete the paperwork and settle the bill, before heading home.

Track flown

Track flown

Flight profile

Flight profile

On the whole I was fairly pleased with how this flight had gone. I’d been aware of poorer weather approaching, but made sure that my planned route gave me plenty of scope to abort the flight safely should the weather deteriorate. Even when the weather did become slightly worse during the flight, I always had the option of clearer weather behind me towards Kemble, and I’d executed the Zone Transit without any problems. Although my landings were nothing to write home about, they were all perfectly safe despite a month without flying, and the flight was only marred by the failure to correctly secure the fuel cap before flight. As always, I hope that the mistake can help me improve for future flights, and I will definitely be making a last check of the fuel caps from the cockpit in future before taking flight!

Total flight time today: 1:25
Total flight time to date: 306:25

 

A flying family again!

September 11, 2016

After a busy month of flying in July, August turned out to be a month with no flying at all, as family holidays and an annoying cough prevented me from doing any flying. Mindful of the fact that it had been over two years since our last flight together as a family, I was keen to try to get the whole family flying again. Catrin had again started to show more interest in flying, and was eager to be allowed to sit in the front and maybe even have a try at the controls. I booked an aircraft for a Sunday, as the weather forecast for the Saturday was pretty poor (and turned out to be fairly accurate too!).

Catrin had just started back at school, so initially the plan was for me to fly solo. However, the poor weather on the Saturday meant that we’d all had a fairly quiet day, and managed to get most of Catrin’s homework out of the way. On the proviso that we didn’t go somewhere too far, Luned agreed that we could once again try to fly somewhere all together. I looked around for some potential destinations, and eventually decided on Northampton Sywell, an airfield I hadn’t visited since February 2015 when I went there with Charlie.

I planned a fairly direct route to Sywell, with a more circuitous one on the return leg. Given Catrin’s recent interest in F1, I decided to overfly Silverstone, and then detour via Brize and Membury in order to do some sightseeing over Swindon before returning to Kemble. A NOTAM check showed that the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight would be carrying out a fly past of two areas that were potentially on our return route, so I took care to plan a route that avoided these areas. Finishing the planning on the Sunday morning, I marked up the chart and phoned Sywell for PPR. The wind was unusually from the South, which helpfully favoured the main ‘hard’ runway at Sywell, but did mean there was a potential for a crosswind on returning to Kemble.

On arrival at Kemble, I got the girls settled in the Club, before going out to check out the aircraft and load up most of our gear while they did some more homework practice. After retrieving a PLB in order to comply with the new regulations that require all aircraft to carry either an ELT or PLB, we all walked out to the aircraft and boarded. This was made slightly more complicated than usual, as with Catrin sitting in the front next to me, this meant that she had to be the last person on board. After a bit of juggling we all got safely on board, and Catrin helpfully held the door open while I carried out the pre-start checklist.

Engine started, ready for the off

Engine started, ready for the off

With the door closed, the engine started (as usual) on its second try, and we spent a little while trying to get Luned’s microphone working correctly on her headset (it seems to have developed a loose connection somewhere) and all the volume levels such that we could comfortably hear each other. We were given taxy clearance initally to Alpha 4 to cross for runway 08, and as we approached we were immediately cleared to cross onto the Charlie taxyway to head to the South side of the airfield. Power checks were completed normally, and we held briefly before being cleared onto the runway to depart. I pointed out the row of switches for fuel pump, landing light etc. to Catrin, telling her I would ask her to turn them on and off during the flight. Another aircraft was approaching the overhead from the North East as we waited (our departure direction) so I took care to get a picture for his height before we took off and turned left towards the disused airfield at Chedworth.

Luned spotted the approaching aircraft high to our right as I departed at around 1500 feet to remain below him, and once we were clear I continued the climb towards our planned cruising altitude of 3500 feet. We passed through some cloud on our way to Chedworth, and a little more after setting course towards Banbury. Catrin was eager to have a go at the controls, but I explained that I needed to get clear of the clouds and talk to Brize before I could give her control. After 5 minutes or so we came out of the patchy cloud into a clear blue sky, and I explained to Catrin how the controls worked and what she should do.

We’d put her child seat in the front with a cushion on top, but sadly she was still not quite tall enough to be able to see over the coaming to fly ‘correctly’ using visual references. I pointed out the ‘clock’ (altimeter) and the heading bug on the DI, and asked her to try and keep us at the same height, and with the arrow on the DI always pointing straight up. She took control and obviously had a tendency to pull back slightly on the control column, as we slowly gained altitude. At one point I explained to Catrin how to lose some height, telling her to push forward on the control column. She did this a little more exuberantly than she should have, prompting an exclamation of alarm from Luned in the back seat! I started to maintain gentle pressure on the controls on my side, showing Catrin just how little movement was actually necessary to make the corrections required. She later explained to me that even though she couldn’t see over the top of the instrument panel, she was looking at “the picture of the little aeroplane so that I could see we were flying straight”. A potential instrument pilot in the making!

Catrin's first go at the controls

Catrin’s first go at the controls

She kept control as we passed Banbury, and I signed off with Brize in order to make contact with Sywell. I stole a quick look over at Catrin to see her beaming face, before she turned and said to me “I can’t believe that I was just really flying a plane!”. Sywell were still operating on the expected runway, so I took a quick look back at the Pooley’s plate in my kneeboard to ensure I had the correct approach in my head, before continuing on towards Northampton. I pointed out Silverstone to Catrin off to our right, and it took her a little while to find it. I thought I could see the occasional glint of sunlight reflecting on cars around the circuit, but it was hard to tell at this distance.

Flying Family Selfie!

Flying Family Selfie!

Approaching Sywell, there was another aircraft turning Downwind as we descended on the deadside, and Luned kept an eye on him for me so that we were aware of his position. As we turned Base he was just touching down, and as we turned Final I announced to the FISO that I had him in sight on the runway. He had obviously just reached the end and turned off, leading to a somewhat bemused FISO commenting “Not aware of one on the runway…”!

Approaching Sywell

Approaching Sywell

I left it a little late to lower the final stage of flap (at least the ‘reds, blues, three greens, flaps’ check caught it!) and my landing was a little long and slightly firmer than I would have liked. We continued to the end of the runway before taxying up to the pumps so that I could refuel the aircraft, hopefully with sufficient that we wouldn’t need to refuel again on our return to Kemble. I went in to the office to pay the landing fee, then walked Luned and Catrin over to the grass area in front of the Pilot’s Mess before returning to the aircraft to refuel at the self service pumps. Once this was done, I pushed the Arrow into a parking space alongside a very smart looking Falcon jet, before rejoining Luned and Catrin and heading upstairs for lunch.

Parked up next to big brother

Parked up next to big brother

The cafe seemed fairly busy, and the sole member of staff was having a job keeping up with the steady flow of business. It was barely 12:30 though, so we were in no real rush. We waited patiently for our food, taking our time eating and watching the comings and goings on the airfield. After finishing her chicken nuggets and chips, Catrin returned to the counter to choose a slice of chocolate cake as her dessert!

Once finished, we all headed back to the aircraft, and I had Luned and Catrin wait alongside while I carried out the checks. Catrin was sitting in the back for the return leg, and we ensured she had everything with her to amuse herself before putting her rucksack into the baggage area. Sadly we later found out that I’d left the camera in the rucksack, so all the photos from the return leg were taken on Luned’s phone.

There was a flurry of activity as we got the engine started, and we followed three other aircraft to hold B2 to carry out our checks. There were a number of aircraft arriving also, meaning it took a little while before it was our turn to depart. Another aircraft was just climbing out as we took to the runway, agreeing to an intersection departure so as not to inconvenience the aircraft in the circuit that was about to turn Base. I left a short gap to ensure that the other aircraft had cleared the climbout path, before applying power and beginning our takeoff roll. The noise abatement procedures call for a climb to 500 feet before turning, but I probably left this a little longer than I should have. I turned left to try to avoid what I thought was the noise sensitive area, before turning back on track to head almost due South to remain clear of the notified BBMF activity.

As we crossed the M1, we spotted Silverstone off to our right, and turned to head for it. Catrin got some good views of the track, even watching some cars heading around it (it appeared to be some sort of track day). We began an orbit to give her a better look, and Luned spotted a glider that appeared to be thermalling over the track. We kept a good eye on him as we carried out the orbit, before spotting a second glider as we continued on track to the West towards Banbury. We spotted Turweston and Hinton in the Hedges off to our left, before descending to 2500 feet near Banbury and making contact with Brize Zone to request our Zone transit. The Controller asked us to report approaching the Zone, and we continued towards Chipping Norton initally, before turning South towards Brize. We spotted the familiar landmarks of Enstone and Little Rissington, as well as a further group of gliders high off to our left, orbiting just below the cloud layer. The air was noticeably more turbulent down at our level, but we continued on, suffering through the occasional bumps.

Track day at Silverstone

Track day at Silverstone

I’d already explained to Catrin that if the radio got busy I would be able to isolate her from the intercom, and she obviously remembered this and asked for this to be done so that she could entertain her in peace! This at least allowed Luned and I to chat amongst ourselves for a while! Catrin was told that she should tap Luned on the shoulder if she needed to talk to us. I called Brize again with 5nm to the boundary, and we were cleared to transit the Zone with no altitude restriction. At some point I had passed Luned the chart, and I had her practice her navigation, asking her to spot the familiar (to me) sights of Burford and Faringdon as we continued. Once clear of the Zone we then looked for Membury, first spotting the M4 off to our right before finding the mast in the ground clutter. I carried out a wide turn over the airfield at Membury, before spotting another aircraft low behind us, perhaps setting up for an approach into there.

Passing RAF Brize Norton

Passing RAF Brize Norton

Redlands’ parachute aircraft had been heard on the Brize frequency preparing for a number of drops earlier, so as usual I remained to the South of the M4, ensuring we were well clear of them. As we approached Swindon, we had Catrin put her entertainment away, and she helped us spot familiar landmarks from the air. The old Renault Building and the Link Centre are always easy landmarks to pick out, and Catrin’s school is also very distinctive from the air. Catrin managed to spot this, and as I orbited Luned managed to spot our house, helpfully made slightly clearer to to me suggesting that she move her car onto the drive before we left home!

Shaw Ridge Primary School

Shaw Ridge Primary School

I can see my house from here!

I can see my house from here!

On previous flights I have continued West from Swindon before turning North around Malmesbury (in order to avoid overflying Oaksey). However there was an air display notified at Charlton Park, and this route would have taken us very close to there. I had already decided that I would therefore fly North West from Swindon, aiming to remain clear of Oaksey and approach Kemble from the East around the Cotswold Water Park.

Kemble seemed relatively quiet as we approached, and as we joined Overhead there was another aircraft about to turn Downwind. After descending on the Deadside and reporting Crosswind, we again located him turning Base, meaning we had plenty of spacing and hence were unlikely to catch him up. The before landing checks were carried out on the Downwind leg, and Catrin got a bit chatty so I isolated myself from the intercom, allowing her and Luned to talk amongst themselves as I carried on around the circuit.

Again I was a little late lowering the final stage of flap, and realised that I had another aircraft behind me in the circuit. After a bit of thought I decided it would be better if I were to land long on runway 26, leaving a relatively short taxy to the far end, enabling me to clear the runway as quickly as possible and hopefully avoid inconveniencing the aircraft behind me. This time the landing was a lot smoother, and the FISO instructed me to vacate to the right and taxy back to the parking area using the grass Golf taxyway.

We taxyed back towards Lyneham’s parking, and I positioned the aircraft in front of the fuel bowser in case we needed to refuel, before having to wait a little while to be able to make the ‘Closing down’ call on the radio. I was on the verge of not bothering with this (it’s not strictly necessary) but luckily a gap opened up enabling me to get the call in. Catrin helped me push the aircraft back into its parking space, before putting all the chocks in place and helping me with the cover. Once this was done, we returned briefly to the Club to settle up all the post-flight paperwork, before retiring to the Thames Head for a quick drink that eventually led to us staying there for our evening meal also!

Tracks flown

Tracks flown

Leg 1 profile

Leg 1 profile

Leg 2 profile

Leg 2 profile

It was really good to have all the family back in the aircraft with me, and Catrin’s delight at having been given control of the aircraft was a real joy to see. Hopefully we can try to find more time in the future to make more such trips, and perhaps even get Luned back into the swing of doing some of the flying after her lessons with Dave several years ago. Today’s flying was really enjoyable, once the initial area of cloud was cleared conditions really couldn’t have been much more perfect. May there be many more days like this in future!

Total flight time today: 2:15
Total flight time to date: 305:00

Landaway in the name of charity

July 30, 2016

After a successful charity flight last year, I again offered a flight up as a raffle prize in aid of Catrin’s school PTA. For some reason, the winner of the raffle never came forward to claim their prize, which was a bit of a shame. I offered a further flight, and this time the school awarded this as a result of a blind auction, which turned out to be a much better idea.

The successful bidder made a very generous bid, so thanks to a relaxation of the rules governing charity flights now allowing landaways, I decided to make this flight a bit more than a simple hour’s local flight. The winner of the auction contacted me in good time, and we met up briefly for a chat so that I could explain what was possible. We eventually settled on a date towards the end of July, for him and his partner to come flying with me.

Initially we were booked in one of the Club’s Warriors due to the Arrow being unavailable. However, that booking was cancelled, and after a quick check of the heights of the two passengers (the Arrow has limited leg room in the rear if the front seat occupant needs their seat to be positioned towards the rear of its travel) I moved the booking to the Arrow for the flight.

It had been over a year since I last visited Wellesbourne with Kev, and with the airfield under threat of closure it seemed a good chance to visit and show my support. The airfield cafe always provides a good lunch, and the airfield is handily placed to be a fairly short flight from Kemble, as well as giving a number of options for sightseeing enroute.

Flying in the middle of Summer can often provide some challenging flying conditions, with prolonged periods of high pressure causing reduced visibility, and the high temperatures leading to turbulent skies. However, the weather for this flight really couldn’t have been much better. In the days leading up to the flight there had been some spells of rain, which had led to excellent visibility. Also, the forecast temperature was slightly cooler than it had been, hopefully giving a smoother ride for my first time passengers.

I initially planned the route to go from Kemble to Chedworth, taking in Banbury and Silverstone enroute, before heading up to Wellesbourne. However, on checking the NOTAMs in the days before the flight I realised that there were some air displays scheduled at Silverstone that day, and some further digging showed that their timings were likely to coincide with the times we would be in the area. As such I removed Silverstone from the route, and instead planned to fly from Banbury direct to Gaydon and then Wellesbourne.

As usual the majority of the planning was carried out in the days leading up to the flight, just leaving me to mark up the chart, print out the plogs and do a last check of NOTAMs in the morning. The weather forecasts proved to be correct, so I let my passengers know that the flight was a go, before heading up to Kemble.

As we had three adults on board for a change, this meant I couldn’t fill the aircraft with fuel and still remain in the weight and balance envelope for the aircraft. However I was able to fill up one of the fuel tanks, leaving the other at tabs. This gave us a total of 41 US gallons on board, giving us sufficient fuel for a three hour flight with a good reserve (the planning showed the total duration was likely to be around an hour and a half).

My passengers Marc and Sam arrived just as I was finishing off the refuelling, and they helped me push the Arrow back into its parking place.

Pushing back to parking after refuelling

Pushing back to parking after refuelling

We then headed into the Club’s offices to complete all the necessary paperwork, and I made a quick call to Wellesbourne to check that all was Ok for our visit. They had nothing unusual to tell me about, but did mention that they were quite busy (which is definitely not unusual whenever I go there to visit!). The office was quite busy with other pilots preparing for a flight, so I gave them a safety briefing as we walked back to the aircraft. Once there, I carried out a thorough ‘A’ check while they waited patiently, and we then boarded the Arrow, with Marc sitting alongside me in the front, and Sam in the rear.

I gave them the final briefing regarding operation of the door, evacuation procedures and the like, before getting ready to start the engine. Luckily I checked the intercom out before starting the engine, as initially we had some problems where Sam couldn’t hear us in the rear. A bit of investigation soon showed the the intercom had been left in ‘Crew’ isolation mode (meaning the rear seats were disconnected from the front), and once rectified we could all hear each other successfully.

The engine took a couple of goes to get started, then we were cleared to taxy to A3 in readiness to cross to the South side of the airfield to get to the hold for runway 08. The frequency was quite busy, and I heard the FISO clear another aircraft into position on the runway as we crossed. I made sure to report that we were vacated, allowing him to clear the other aircraft to depart with minimum delay.

Taxying past a 747 parked at Kemble

Taxying past a 747 parked at Kemble

The power checks were all completed normally, and after a quick check that everyone was good to go, I announced that we were ready. The FISO cleared us to backtrack, and as we did I double checked that he had no known traffic to affect a left turn out direct onto our planned track.

The takeoff roll and climbout were all normal, but it was noticeable that we were heavier than normal with three adults on board. The rate of climb was noticeable lower than usual, but certainly nothing to be concerned about. We climbed up to 2500 feet, finding it a little difficult to sign off with Kemble as the frequency became busy again.

Climbing away from Kemble

Climbing away from Kemble

We signed on with Brize for a Basic Service, initially being asked to ‘Standby’ by the Controller. When he came back to us, I had to correct one letter of our callsign, but we were granted a Basic Service and assigned a squawk. I’d already given Marc a quick brief of the controls before we departed, so after checking everything was clear with him I handed control over to him.

Marc at the controls

Marc at the controls

I’d allowed us to drift slightly to the right of our planned track, and as I pointed out Little Rissington to them I realised that we were going to pass much closer to it than planned. I had Marc carry out a quick course correction, and we continued on towards Banbury, spotting it easily off in the distance. Marc made a good job of maintaining our course, even coping well with a few small pockets of turbulence that caused a relatively sharp bank to the left on one occasion.

Passing Little Rissington

Passing Little Rissington

As we approached Banbury, I reset the heading bug to point to the next leg, and asked Marc to carry out a left turn onto the appropriate course once we were overhead the town. I signed off with Brize in readiness to contact Wellesbourne, the Controller helpfully reminding me that Hinton were active with parachuting today. As Marc made the turn towards Gaydon I made contact with Wellesbourne to get their details, discovering that they were still operating on 36 with a left hand circuit, meaning we’d be approaching from the ‘wrong’ direction from Gaydon for an Overhead Join.

Gaydon was a little difficult to spot, as we were approaching with the main runway at right angles to us. Also, there didn’t seem to be as many vehicles on the ground there as I remember from last time I was in the area. I took control back from Marc as we passed overhead, before turning us towards Wellesbourne and descending to 2000 feet for the Overhead Join.

Descending Deadside at Wellesbourne

Descending Deadside at Wellesbourne

The frequency was suprisingly quiet as we approached, with one aircraft in the circuit as we joined overhead. As we began the wide descent on the Deadside I spotted him on Short Final, and he touched down as we turned Crosswind. We had the circuit to ourselves after that, and I did my best to follow Wellesbourne’s requested noise abatement circuit. I had to wait a little to make my Downwind and Final calls due to other traffic on the frequency, and on Final I requested that we be allowed to taxy to the far end of the airfield rather than taking the first left part way down the runway.

Short Final at Wellesbourne

Short Final at Wellesbourne

This was approved by the FISO, and I brought us in for a deliberately long landing, touching down a little more firmly than I would have liked. The FISO she asked us if we were visiting a specific company on the airfield. I responded ‘Negative, we just wanted to get a look at the Vulcan’. She chuckled a little, and responded ‘Ok, feel free to pause there for a while if you like!’. We vacated at the far end, and I paused for the after landing checks in front of the Vulcan, allowing Marc to get some decent photos.

Vulcan XM655 at Wellesbourne

Vulcan XM655 at Wellesbourne

The FISO went off frequency for a short period, meaning we had to find our own space to park. I chose the first space I found, somewhat further North of the Tower than I had parked previously. After shutting down we all disembarked, before strolling down the taxyway in the thoroughly pleasant conditions. I headed up to the Tower to settle the landing fee, chatting for a while to the staff up there while Marc and Sam took in the scenery.

Vulcan XM655 at Wellesbourne

qVulcan XM655 at Wellesbourne

We retired to the Cafe for lunch, all of us choosing a combination of sausage and / or bacon sandwiches. We had quite a wait for the food to arrive, but we were in no rush and certainly weren’t upset as a result. We all had a good chat about the kinds of flying I tend to do, with Marc and Sam both expressing an interest to fly with me again in the future. Our food arrived as the queue to order grew ever longer, and was excellent as ever.

We talked while we ate, discussing various aspects of flying and the practicalities of flying in the UK. Once we had all finished, we headed back to the aircraft, and I carried out a quick walkaround check before we all boarded. It was Sam’s turn in the front, and once we were all settled I got the engine started easily and requested departure and taxy information from the FISO. We taxyed past a helicopter with rotors running, and I carried out the power checks near the hold for 36. While I did this, I noticed that the low volts light was illuminated again, and once the checks were complete I reset the master switch, which cleared the light.

On the ground at Wellesbourne - low volts light illuminated

On the ground at Wellesbourne – low volts light illuminated

As I became ready to depart, the helicopter was given his departure clearance, so I decided to wait until he had taken off before reporting ready myself. There was a slight delay before the helicopter became airborne, and when I reported ready the FISO reminded us of the required right turn after departure to avoid one of the noise sensitive areas on the climbout from runway 36. We took to the runway and began our takeoff roll, and as we rotated I noticed that the low volts light was on again. I put it out of my mind temporarily to concentrate on the takeoff and circuit, and we spotted another aircraft descending on the deadside as we completed the noise abatement turn and turned left into the circuit.

Climbing away from Wellesbourne after the noise abatement turn

Climbing away from Wellesbourne after the noise abatement turn

Normally I would continue onto the Downwind leg before climbing out of the circuit, but that would have put us in close proximity to the arriving aircraft. I decided to climb immediately, informing the FISO of this, and the fact that I was visual with the other aircraft. We climbed up to 3000 feet, and set course to the South for our return to Kemble. Marc spotted a glider off to our left as we departed, helpfully pointing it out and giving me good instructions as to where to find it. Sam also spotted an aircraft close by to our right, passing below us as we continued on course.

Once we were established in the cruise, my focus returned to the low volts light, which was still lit. I repeated the procedure of resetting the master switch (after powering down most of the avionics), and this time the light remained extinguished, even after powering up the avionics again. If it had remained lit, I would have had to take the decision to either return to Wellesbourne, or continue on to Kemble aiming to reduce the power drain, potentially arriving at Kemble non-radio should the battery power become depleted.

As we continued South, I gave Sam a quick brief on the controls, before handing control over to her. She immediately spotted another aircraft ahead of us and to the right, so I took back control to position us behind him. Once it was clear our flight paths weren’t converging, I handed back control to Sam and she flew us on towards Brize while I made contact on the Zone frequency to request our Zone Transit.

Sam's turn at the controls

Sam’s turn at the controls

My initial call was blocked by another aircraft on frequency, and I had to repeat the request. While negotiating the initial ‘pass your message’ response and setting the squawk, we approached to just a few miles away from the Northern boundary of Brize’s Class  airspace. I was about to contact the Controller to remind him of our position, when he cleared us into their airspace, not above 3000 feet. That was the level we were cruising at, so I helped Sam reduce our height by a couple of hundred feet, explaining the operation of the altimeter to her as we did so. As we entered Brize’s Zone, she handed control back to me, and I positioned the aircraft so that they would get a good view down the right hand side.

Passing overhead RAF Brize Norton

Passing overhead RAF Brize Norton

Unusually, the Controller did not announce as we entered and then left Controlled Airspace, but once clear to the South I pointed out Faringdon, and Marc identified the Defence Academy at Shrivenham off to our right. A new Controller queried our routing to Kemble (via Membury), and as we approached the Motorway Services I signed off with Brize. Helpfully the Controller reminded us that Redlands was active (I’d heard their parachuting aircraft on frequency as we made the initial contact), and we turned overhead Membury to head West towards Wroughton to remain South of the M4.

Wroughton is now another former airfield that is covered in solar panels, so was easy to spot. From there we identified various recognisable areas of Swindon, before heading towards the Link Centre and the old Renault building to spot the school and Sam’s house. They both quickly oriented themselves, pointing out various other areas of the town that they recognised from this new (to them!) vantage point.

Shaw Ridge Primary School

Shaw Ridge Primary School

After taking a few photos and completing the orbit, we headed West in order to approach Kemble from the South, hence avoiding getting too close to Oaksey Park. I contacted Kemble to inform them that we’d be approaching from Marlborough, and getting the arrival details we needed. I quickly realised my mistake, contacting him to correct myself and inform him we were in fact approaching from Malmesbury, receiving the response ‘Yes, I’d worked that out for myself!’

On the way to Malmesbury Marc spotted Lyneham off to the left, and we also flew near the WOMAD music festival that was taking place at Charlton Park. Marc spotted another airfield ahead and to our left, which I identified as Hullavington, and we turned North at Malmesbury to head into Kemble. They were still operating on runway 08, meaning we were nicely oriented for an Overhead Join. The circuit sounded quite busy as we approached, but we were able to slot in easily with the other traffic.

I carried out a nice tidy circuit, with another aircraft landing and backtracking as we turned onto the Downwind leg. The before landing checklist was completed normally, and the Base and Final turns got us nicely aligned with the runway. Knowing I would be taxying to the far end, I deliberately aimed for a point some way down the runway, and brought us in for a second landing that was again a little firmer than I would have liked!

We were cleared to taxy back to Lyneham’s parking area via Alpha, and as we approached the other aircraft I spotted Luned and Catrin waiting for us on the other side of the fence. We shut down near the pumps to refuel, and I went to get them so that Catrin could be my helpful assistant during the refuel and push back of the aircraft. She helped me tie the aircraft down and get the chocks in place, before we put the cover back on as Kev arrived back in one of the Club’s Warriors after having taken some people up for an experience flight.

PIlot, passengers and Dad's little helper after a very successful flight!

PIlot, passengers and Dad’s little helper after a very successful flight!

I bade farewell to Marc and Sam, and they expressed an interest in flying with me again. It’s always nice to have interested passengers to accompany me should I have seats spare, so I’ll definitely be in touch with them in future should the opportunity arrive. Luned, Catrin and I walked back to the Club so that I could complete all the post-flight paperwork, before we joined in the Club’s barbequeue, talking briefly to Kev’s wife and son while Catrin and Luned played some tennis!

Tracks flown

Tracks flown

Leg 1 profile

Leg 1 profile

Leg 2 profile

Leg 2 profile

I was pleased to have completed another Charity flight, being able to introduce first-time flyers to light aircraft is a great feeling, particularly when they seem to enjoy the flight as much as Marc and Sam had done. I’ll definitely be offering further flights to raise funds, and hope that my future passengers get as much enjoyment out of the experience as Marc and Sam had.

Total flight time today: 2:00
Total flight time to date: 302:45

A mid-week day at the beach

July 6, 2016

After a good spell of flying, I’d managed to go almost 6 weeks without a flight due to one reason and another. Keen to put an end to this dry spell and avoid another currency check, I arranged with work to allow me to take a short notice day’s holiday, only confirming it the day before once weather and aircraft availability coincided. After a busy period with his own work, David managed to find time in his schedule to accompany me, and in the days leading up to the flight we discussed various options for destinations.

I initially discarded a possible trip to Redhill due to the RA(T) in place for the Farnborough air show. Also a visit to Booker (Wycombe Air Park) and some other local airfields was abandoned due to the NOTAM about a major gliding competition in progress at Booker. We’d discussed East Anglia as a possible destination in the past, but looking at the various airfields available showed that most of them were grass and (relatively) short.

After a bit more digging David suggested a visit to Skegness. This is a grass strip located within a caravan park, with 650m and 799m runways. These seemed ample to take an Arrow into (we’d been to Headcorn in the Arrow previously – admittedly much longer but we’d had ample room to spare there). Keen to reset all my currencies in one day, I also added Fenland as a second stop (600m and 670m runways) for fuel on the return leg.

The route was complicated slightly by the RA(T) in place for the Royal International Air Tattoo at Fairford. Kemble lies within the RA(T), but has 4 pre-defined entry and exit lanes enabling flights to still be carried out. I spoke to a helpful chap at Kemble to clarify some of the finer details of the procedures during the early planning stages, and everything suggested we could expect the flight to go ahead as planned, with the only minor exception of possibly having to depart from Kemble to the North West initially, should the North East exit lane be unavailable.

As ever, the majority of the planning and route selection was carried out the night before, leading to a simple visual route of Kemble -> Northleach Roundabout -> Banbury -> Rushden -> Peterborough Conington -> Fenland -> Skegness. In order to avoid the Danger Area in The Wash, I planned to follow the North Western coast of The Wash up to Skegness, rather than routing direct from Fenland.

After getting Catrin off to school, I completed the final planning, NOTAM check, weather check and marked up the route on the chart. I managed to get hold of someone at Fenland before leaving the house to check for any last minute hitches (other than a Farmers’ Fly In, there was nothing unusual), but was unable to reach anyone at Skegness before leaving for Kemble. I left a message on one of the listed numbers, and a very helpful chap phoned back as I was driving to the airfield. After pulling over he gave me a very thorough brief on the use of the airfield, and also some tips as to what to do while we were there.

On arrival at Kemble, I checked through the aircraft’s paperwork before completing the relevant documentation required for our flight. David arrived in good time, and we headed out to the aircraft. Usually I would fill the Arrow with fuel before any flight just to give me further options, but as we were headed into relatively short grass runways, I opted this time to leave with the ‘standard’ fuel load (allowing for around 3 hours flying time). This would give me plenty to get to Skegness and then Fenland to refuel, with the further option of using Conington or perhaps Sywell should the need arise.

Once on board, I used David’s handheld to request our start and inform the FISO of our requested routing out of the RA(T), expecting that there may be some delay as he negotiated this with Brize. However, I was given immediate approval to start, and once started up we were clear to Alpha 1 for our checks. These were all completed normally (with another aircraft that was preparing to depart alongside us) and we moved up to the hold and announced that we were ready to depart.

We were given our departure clearance (not above 1500 feet on the Fairford QNH via the Green Route) and after reading back were immediately given ‘Take off at your discretion’. This is slightly unusual (typically Kemble will ask to ‘report lined up’ due to the undulations in the runway) and I queried with David that I had understood the FISO correctly.

Once on the runway we immediately began our takeoff roll as the aircraft behind us was given his clearance, taking to the air and turning right direct on track towards the Northleach Roundabout (the exit point of the route we were using).  Once clear of the ATZ I asked for a frequency change to Brize Zone (the RA(T)’s Controlling Authority), but was told to remain with Kemble until we were clear of the Restricted Airspace. It was definitely a little disconcerting to have to remain below 1500 feet (effectively about 1000 feet off the ground) while within the RA(T), usually on this portion of the flight I would be climbing up to 3000 or 4000 feet! Once clear, we contacted Brize Radar for a Basic Service, and climbed up to our cruising altitude of 3500 feet.

Departing Kemble not above 1500 feet

Departing Kemble not above 1500 feet

David thought there may have been an issue with the transponder, as he noticed that the ‘ident’ light wasn’t flickering as it normally would to show that we were being interrogated by a ground radar station. I asked the Controller for a Mode C check, and he gave us the Brize QNH and asked for our current altitude. I informed him of this, and after a brief pause he confirmed that the transponder was working correctly.

It was immediately clear how much quieter the skies were when flying on a weekday, and David and I chatted as we continued on the route. There were small amounts of scattered cloud around, some of which were up at our level so I just flew through. David’s PilotAware device was helpfully warning us of some of the traffic we passed, and as we approached Banbury the Brize Controller asked who we would be working next. I advised him it would be Sywell (which led to a brief discussion with David as to whether Coventry might perhaps be better), and on reaching Banbury we switched frequency and listened in to Sywell.

Some cloud enroute

Some cloud enroute

We passed well clear of their ATZ, turning at Rushden towards Conington. David had entered a more direct route into SkyDemon, and queried my routing on this leg. I advised him of the route I had planned, and we continued on towards Conington. As we were turning in their overhead, I gave them a quick call just to advise them of this (not strictly necessary as we were well above their ATZ at our current altitude) and we spotted Conington on time and turned towards Fenland.

We contacted Fenland as we approached their overhead, and asked them for a wind check to gauge which runway would be most appropriate to use at Skegness. The relatively calm wind seemed to favour the shorter runway 29, but I decided to live with the small crosswind and use the longer runway 03 instead. David agreed that this was probably the best decision, opting for runway length over the slight advantage of the small headwind that would have been present on runway 29.

As we flew overhead Fenland, David asked for a steep turn to the right to enable him to get some photos, and once this was complete I routed towards the North West coast of The Wash to keep clear of the Danger Area. As we made the turn, a loud flapping noise could be heard off to the right of the aircraft, and on investigation we realised that the strap from David’s camera case had gone through a gap in the door and was flapping against the aircraft outside. David realised he hadn’t fully latched the door (the top latch was closed, but the lower latch wasn’t fully made). Once the strap was retrieved the noise disappeared, and we continued on.

Passing Fenland

Passing Fenland

The town of Skegness was easy to spot in the distance, and I oriented myself using the chart to find the airfield. We spotted this quite easily as we approached, and I made traffic announcements on the Safetycom frequency in case anyone else was operating near the airfield.

Approaching Skegness

Approaching Skegness

From the overhead we could see that the windsock was pretty limp, and stuck with our decision to land on runway 03. I carried out a standard Overhead Join, descending on the deadside and continuing on a Left Downwind as per the Pooley’s plates. The airfield’s noise abatement calls for the Base Leg turn to be made before the town of Skegness, and this seemed very close in as we continued Downwind and completed the before landing checks.

Descending Deadside at Skegness. Hangars visible in front of the wing.

Descending Deadside at Skegness. Hangars visible in front of the wing.

I turned Base, and flew a slightly slower approach than normal so as to land in as little distance as possible. As I turned Final I failed to allow for the slight tailwind on Base leg, and ended up overshooting the centre line. Normally this would be easy to resolve, but given the fact the the Final leg was quite short and I was also a little slower than normal, I resisted the temptation to tighten the turn in order to get correctly lined up, and instead took an early decision to abandon the approach and Go Around (prompting a ‘Good decision’ from David alongside).

Realising my mistake, I flew a slightly wider Downwind leg on the next circuit in order to give myself more time on Base. This time the Base to Final turn was flown correctly, and I brought us in for a nice gentle touchdown on the excellently prepared runway at Skegness. With little or no braking we were easily slowed down, and I parked up on the left hand side near a rather dilapidated looking twin.

Parked up at Skegness

Parked up at Skegness

The advice given to me on the phone earlier was very useful. We walked the short distance from the airfield to the Leisure Park reception building to pay the (very reasonable) £7 landing fee, before walking to the on-site pub for lunch. They were only serving a carvery today, so David and I both had an excellent ‘small’ carvery, which was incredible value considering it also came with a free dessert! David took advantage of not doing any flying today by accompanying his lunch with a beer, while I made do with a lemonade.

A rather more substantial lunch than usual!

A rather more substantial lunch than usual!

Having had a more substantial lunch than I would usually do while flying, it seemed a good idea to go for a walk and try to find the beach. I had been given directions on the phone earlier, but I’m not sure the way we ended up walking to the beach was the most direct route. However, we arrived there in about 10 minutes or so, and were pleasantly surprised by the condition of the beach, and the various amenities around it.

A short walk to the beach

A short walk to the beach

My attempts to shortcut the walk back only ended up in us having to retrace our steps a couple of times, but we were soon approaching the airfield again ready for the next leg to Fenland. As we walked to the aircraft we debated which runway to use, and the windsock this time seemed to be slightly favouring runway 21 (which was helpful as it meant a very short taxy, and also allowed us to depart almost directly on track). We examined the area of grass before the start of the runway, and decided that we could also use this to give ourselves another 50m or so of ground roll.

Checking out the undershoot for 21

Checking out the undershoot for 21

We were both geniunely impressed by how well maintained the strip was, particularly given that it seemed to be done by people on a completely voluntary basis. The clubhouse being closed that day was no real inconvenience to us, as the reception building was a very short walk away, and on the way to most of the other amenities anyway. Definitely a great place to bring the family for a flight!

After a quick check of the aircraft, the engine started easily and I carried out the power checks in our parking space. Using the area before the start of the runway allowed us to get airborne in probably 2/3 of the runway length, and once airborne I turned right to avoid Skegness, before setting course down the coast towards Fenland.

David spotted the airfield before me, as I was looking a lot further into the distance than I should have been! We tried to reach them on the radio, but received no response. We could hear other aircraft arriving and departing, and learned that they were operating off the longer, into wind runway. I set up for an Overhead Join for this runway, descending on the Deadside and continuing around the circuit. The Air Ground operator started responding again (it seemed he had been on the handheld and the batteries had gone flat!) and I made a much better job of the approach this time. We both spotted some wires on Short Final at around the same time, and I added a quick burst of power to ensure we were well clear of them.

Descending Deadside at Fenland

Descending Deadside at Fenland

Mindful of the shorter runway I kept a close eye on our airspeed, bringing us in for another smooth landing (grass runways certainly do flatter the landings!). We taxyed up towards the buildings, parking at the self-service pump to refuel the aircraft. David headed in to settle the landing fee, as I looked for somewhere to park. I hadn’t realised from my phone conversation earlier, but the the fly-in aircraft were all still here and the parking area was very busy. I had to squeeze past a Chipmunk on the end of a row, before parking next to an R44 right at the back of the parking area.

Busy parking area

Busy parking area

We were only stopping for a quick breather, but the club house looked well appointed and comfortable. Sadly neither of us took the time to check the food choices available, but they had a fully stocked bar which suggests that they were well organised. Their website does list the usual airfield fayre, at what seem to be reasonable prices. Maybe we need to come back again to sample them!

After a quick drink and a chat with the locals, we headed back to the aircraft and I performed another quick walkaround, before being sure to carry out a fuel drain check after having refuelled. The engine was still warm this time, and it took a couple of goes to get it started. We then taxyed towards the runway in use, carrying out our power checks behind another PA28 ahead of us. A Cessna carried out a touch and go, then the PA28 departed and we took our turn to backtrack. I had noticed that the ‘Low Volts’ light had remained on, a common occurrence in the Arrow, which usually corrects itself during the power checks, but hadn’t this time. I decided that if it hadn’t cleared when we were airborne, I would try resetting the Battery Master switch (something that generally clears it) and if that still didn’t resolve it we would land at Conington.

Again I used the full short field takeoff technique (2 stages of flap, increasing to full power on the brakes before releasing them). We’d seen the PA28 ahead of us become airborne around the intersection, and it took us a little longer than that. We still had plenty of runway left as I rotated, and I turned slightly left to avoid the small trees that were in the next field off the end of the runway. We climbed to altitude, and I reset the master as planned, which fortunately did clear the low volts light.

We cruised at 4500 feet, briefly contacting Conington as we passed to let them know we were Overhead. Sywell sounded relatively busy as we passed by, and later a quick peek at SkyDemon showed that I was potentially heading for an infringement of the Daventry CTA that started at 4500 feet (our current cruising altitude) off to our right. I corrected this, and we continued on, spotting Silverstone off in the distance to our left.

Great day for a flight!

Great day for a flight!

We spotted quite a few aircraft a lot lower than us on this leg, a number of them being picked up on the Pilot Aware device. As we approached Banbury, I made ready to contact Brize. David thought I would be better contacting Brize Radar for a LARS service before asking for entry to the RA(T), but I decided to go straight to Brize Zone. In my initial call, I asked for a ‘Basic Service and entry to Kemble via the Green Route’. After having to repeat our callsign due to our transmission being blocked (presumably the Controller was working two frequencies, as I hadn’t hear another aircraft), the Controller didn’t ask me to pass my full message, immediately granting me a Basic Service and clearance into the RA(T), as well as providing a squawk.

I began a gradual descent to ensure we were down at the required 2500 feet before reaching the Northleach Roundabout. We passed by Little Rissington, and then spotted Northleach ahead and to our left. Kemble became clearly visible in the distance, and I advised the Controller that we were visual, and asked for a frequency change so that we could at least get the active runway and QFE before Kemble closed (it was around 16:50). The Controller granted this request, and I queried whether we should retain the squawk (receiving an ‘affirm’ in response). Above us to our left we spotted an aircraft making its approach into Fairford (I think it was a C13) and we continued on, making contact with Kemble.

Escort into Kemble, look carefully!

Escort into Kemble, look carefully!

They gave us the active runway and QFE, and informed us that there was an aircraft operating in the circuit. As we approached we learned it was the Gryphon Air Cherokee, and I set us up for a standard Overhead Join for runway 26. The other aircraft was becoming airborne as we approached the overhead, and the FISO asked us to report Downwind. We heard one of Bristol Aero Club’s Instructors calling for taxy, and while we were descending on the Deadside the FISO gave all stations the current QNH, QFE, runway in use and Cotswold pressure setting, before closing down for the evening.

It took us a little while to spot the aircraft ahead of us on Downwind, but David spotted him on a wide Base leg as I carried out the before landing checks. We followed him around, catching him slightly as we turned Base and he turned Final. He was carrying out a Touch and Go however, so I was confident he would clear the runway in time. We also spotted the Bristol Aero Club aircraft at A1, waiting to depart.

After the aircraft ahead cleared the runway in good time, I deliberately landed long, deciding that this was much safer than trying to attempt a backtrack with no FISO on duty. The landing was again nice and gentle, but I neglected to brake sufficiently so was unable to make the first turn off the runway. Sensibly the Bristol Aero Club aircraft asked us to confirm when we had vacated the runway (there is a distinct elevation change on the runway at Kemble, that means you can’t see the opposite end of the runway). We made the second turn off, and I announced ‘Runway Vacated’ as we crossed the hold line.

We taxyed back to Lyneham’s parking area via Golf and Alpha, and as we approached we noticed that the Bulldog was parked on the taxyway at 90 degrees to the usual parking direction. As we got closer I realised we wouldn’t be able to safely taxy up to the bowser with the aircraft in its current position. I shut down before our parking area, and then ended up in the way of a couple of vehicles (including an HGV) that had to squeeze past us to use the gate out onto the airfield’s perimeter road.

David and I refuelled the aircraft and pushed it back into the parking area, putting the cover back on just as Roger came out to carry out a flight in the Bulldog with some new members. I headed in to the Club to complete the usual post-flight paperwork, before heading home.

Tracks flown

Tracks flown

Leg 1 profile

Leg 1 profile

Leg 2 profile

Leg 2 profile

Leg 3 profile

Leg 3 profile

It’s always good to fly with David, and he’d made an excellent choice of destination in Skegness today. The facilities there were top notch, despite it being run and maintained by volunteers. Its location inside the Caravan Park and near the beach mean it’s an ideal destination to take the family at some point in the future. Fenland also looked like a place it would be worth going back to, if only to sample their food!

It had been a really enjoyable day of flying, taking me to an area of the country I hadn’t previously visited, and providing a couple of challenging landings at two new airfields. Not only that, today’s flying has put me over the 300 hour mark, which while having no real meaning, is a milestone nonetheless. A successful flying year continues!

Total flight time today: 3:05
Total flight time to date: 300:45

A Warrior, 3 Zone Transits and two new airfields

May 29, 2016

I’m always keen to add new airfields to my logbook, it helps maintain my interest in flying, and prevent me getting stuck in a rut visiting the same old airfields over and over. The family were planning to visit the in-laws during the school holiday, which gave me a Bank Holiday weekend largely to myself. Initially I hoped to take the Arrow to a few airfields a little further afield, but Kev was using it for the week to take his family on holiday to Europe.

The Club has had a few niggling problems with its Warriors recently (including issues with the radios) so I was a little reticent to take one on a longer trip. In the days leading up to the weekend I talked quite a bit with the Club’s Ops Manager, and he explained that G-BPAF (the aircraft I flew my first solo in at RAF Brize Norton) was having its audio panel replaced at the moment, and this should get rectify the problems. So I booked the aircraft for the Sunday for a short slot with a view to improving my confidence, before taking a longer trip on the Bank Holiday Monday.

As the weekend approached however, it became clear that in fact Sunday would be the better day to fly, and Mike gave me an update after the aircraft returned from maintenance on the Saturday, assuring me that all the communications issues had now been fixed. So I switched my plans, intending to make the longer trip on the Sunday, still keeping my Monday booking for some more flying should the conditions turn out to be flyable after all.

I spent most of my early life living in Skelmersdale, Lancashire, and had always wanted to take an opportunity to fly in the area. Blackpool Airport seemed a good choice as a first destination, enabling me to plan for a Zone Transit of Liverpool’s CTR before doing a bit of sight-seeing in the area. While looking for another airfield to visit, I had made contact with Leeds East (formerly RAF Church Fenton) and was a little disappointed to learn that their catering facilities would be unavailable on Bank Holiday Monday due to an event that was being held there. I initially planned to revisit Sherburn-in-Elmet again for lunch, but after switching the day of the flight I updated the plan to visit Leeds East after all. The final airfield on the trip was planned to be Nottingham, an airfield I’ve visited a number of times.

As usual I completed the majority of the planning the night before the flight, this time taking the opportunity to also draw in the route on the charts (both Southern and Northern half-mill required for this trip!) and get as much as possible ready. That way, I hoped I could make an earlier than usual start, to enable me to arrive at Blackpool before their short closure period between 11:30am and Noon (local time). An email to Blackpool’s ATC confirmed that the airfield was still available outside of these closure times, and also served to receive PPR.

The forecast looked near perfect on the morning of the flight, and I completed the planning in good time. I arrived at Kemble slightly earlier than normal, but probably spent slightly longer than usual pre-flighting the aircraft as it had been a while since I had last flown a Warrior. I also filled the tanks to the brim, planning to re-fuel at Leeds East at the mid point of the day’s flying.

The starter on the Warrior seemed a little reluctant at first, but the engine started relatively easily and I set about preparing the slightly unfamiliar cockpit. I took the time to carry out a radio check on both radios for my own peace of mind, and was cleared to taxy via Golf to the North Apron for power checks. Again, I took my time with these as the procedure is slightly different between the Warrior and Arrow (no prop to adjust, but an additional check of carb heat required). Everything proved normal, and after announcing I was ready I was cleared straight onto the runway to depart.

After requesting a left turn out from the FISO, I applied full power and accelerated along the runway. The Warrior needed much less of a ‘pull’ to become airborne, and before reaching Kemble Village I turned left to head direct towards Gloucester, climbing up to my planned cruising altitude of 4500 feet. There was a fair amount of cloud around, but there were also plenty of gaps in order to see the ground below, and enable a descent if required while maintaining VFR.

Departing Kemble

Departing Kemble

I signed off with Kemble, and contact Gloucester as usual for a Basic Service, informing them I was planning to pass through their overhead at 4500 feet. the frequency was relatively quiet as I continued, but I heard a Student on a solo navigation exercise struggling slightly with his R/T, and informing Gloucester he may have to turn before reaching their overhead due to cloud. He was a lot lower than I was, and as such was probably just below the base of the scattered clouds.

Scattered cloud

Scattered cloud

On passing Gloucester I was asked to report passing Great Malvern, and continued on as planned. The difference in speed between the Warrior and Arrow was definitely noticeable (I tend to fly Warriors at 90 knots, whereas the Arrow will easily make 125 knots, some 40% quicker), and it took a little longer than I anticipated to spot Great Malvern off to the left. I was trying on this flight to avoid looking at SkyDemon too much, marking my progress on the printed PLOG as I flew, only taking brief looks at my tablet every so often to confirm my position. This probably explains why my track flown is a lot straighter than usual, I was doing it based on the DI rather than continually making adjustments based on what SkyDemon was telling me!

I listened in to Shawbury after signing off with Gloucester, as expected hearing nothing from them. I next contacted Sleap as I approached, just to let them know I was passing overhead, but not requesting any service from them. They sounded relatively busy, with one pilot reporting that he was abandoning his flight due to poor visibility. Again, he was obviously operating in the hazy later below the clouds, up where I was the visibility was excellent.

After passing Sleap I began a descent down to 2000 feet, to ensure I was below the airways around Hawarden, and also below Manchester’s CTA, which starts at 2500 feet to the South of Liverpool. I had planned to contact Liverpool as I approached Wrexham, to ask for a Zone Transit from Chester to the M6 / M58 junction (conveniently close to Skelmersdale). If I were refused, I had also planned a second route to the West of Liverpool, remaining below their airspace.

I listened in to them as I approached, hearing another of other VFR aircraft on frequency, which gave me hope that I would be granted the transit. I made my initial contact and request, and was a little disappointed when the Controller’s reponse started “We’re a little busy…”, but fortunately she continued “…can you accept a transit further to the West?”. I quickly responded ‘affirm’, and was given clearance through their CTR not above 1500 feet, initially entering at Neston, routing North towards Seaforth. I used the chart to locate the VRPs, before adjusting the route in SkyDemon appropriately.

Passing Hawarden

Passing Hawarden

The new route took me just to the West of Hawarden, and I spotted the Flintshire Bridge that crossed the River Dee. A quick check of the chart showed that this was directly on my route to Neston, making it easy to follow my approved route to enter the Zone. I continued North, passing Bebington and Birkenhead, before getting some excellent views of the City off to my right, enabling me to get some good photos as I passed.

Liverpool Airport

Liverpool Airport

The Radio City Tower

The Radio City Tower

The Liver Building and Pier Head

The Liver Building and Pier Head

I reported leaving the Zone at Seaforth, and after a quick check of the chart, set course for Skem, climbing to 2000 feet. The Controller reminded me to remain clear of Manchester’s airspace (starting at 2500 feet in this area) and I remained on frequency for a Basic Service until it was time to continue North towards Blackpool. I passed by Ormskirk, and was soon over Skem, identifying many landmarks from my childhood (my old secondary school and the Concourse shopping centre) and even managed to locate the house where I grew up without too much difficulty.

West Bank, Glenburn and the Concourse Shopping Centre

West Bank, Glenburn and the Concourse Shopping Centre

My childhood home

My childhood home

After a quick orbit to get some photos, I set course towards Southport, informing the Controller. As I approached Southport I signed off and started to listen in to Blackpool, hearing another aircraft reporting inbound from Caernarfon out over the sea. We were both approaching to arrive at around the same time, and as I signed on I was passed details of the other traffic by the Controller. I had trouble picking him out in the haze, but he replied that he was visual with me, and would follow me in.

Blackpool itself was easy to spot, and I also had little trouble identifying the airfield as I approached. I set up for a Left Downwind join as requested, hearing the air ambulance waiting to cross the field as I turned Base and then Final. I spotted the aircraft coming in from Caernarfon behind me as I turned, and he offered to orbit where he was to enable the helicopter to cross the Final Approach track after I had landed. My first Warrior landing in a while was pretty good considering, nice and gentle but perhaps slightly flat. The technique for landing a Warrior is slightly different to the Arrow, as the Warrior tends to float a lot more, requiring power to be completely removed when starting the roundout and holdoff. However, the Arrow seems to prefer a trickle of power in the roundout, before removing it completely.

Downwind at Blackpool, the Tower a useful landmark

Downwind at Blackpool, the Tower a useful landmark

I had slowed enough to make the first turn off to the right onto Echo, but the Controller instructed me to take the third right onto runway 31, before giving me further taxy instructions via Alpha to park in front of where the old terminal building used to be. I parked up behind a couple of other aircraft, before heading in to pay my landing fee. My initial plan had been to continue on to Leeds East for lunch, but it was already nearly 1pm and I was getting hungry!

Parked up at Blackpool

Parked up at Blackpool

I assured the guy taking landing fees that I wouldn’t exceed my 2 hour free parking, before heading to a pub just around the corner for a light lunch. I was a little concerned at how slow their service appeared, and when they told me there was a half hour wait for food I became slightly worried that I might not make it back in time. Blackpool had a commercial aircraft expected, and would transition to ‘secure’ operation around 2pm, meaning I wouldn’t be able to make any payment due to that area being restricted to their Commercial passengers. Fortunately my food arrived in good time, and I was back at the airfield just before 2pm anyway, before the restrictions came in to place.

I had to wait for a short while to book out with ATC, before heading out to the aircraft and carrying out a quick transit check. After calling and receiving approval to start, I then called for taxy, and was given somewhat more complex instructions than I was used to (to E2 via A, B, C and E!). I carried out the power checks on Echo behind another aircraft waiting to depart, then took my place at the hold once he departed.

There was another short delay while two other inbound aircraft landed, then I was cleared on to the runway. I was unsure just how much runway was available to me from the intersection, so requested (and was granted) a backtrack. Once in position, I was cleared to take off, and began the takeoff roll. On climbout, I had a good view of Blackpool Pleasure Beach off to my right, and once out over the sea I turned right to head North towards Fleetwood, primarily so that I could get some good photos of Blackpool on the way!

Blackpool Pleasure Beach

Blackpool Pleasure Beach

Blackpool Tower

Blackpool Tower

Blackpool had been notifying people heading North that the Gliding field at Chipping was active, so rather than continue all the way to Fleetwood, I turned East to head direct for my next turning point at Burnley to try and stay clear of the gliders. Climbing up to 3000 feet, I passed close by the disused airfield at Samlesbury (interestingly misspelt as Salmesbury in SkyDemon!), using SkyDemon a little more on this leg to orient myself given the large number of similar sized towns on the route.

Samlesbury

Samlesbury

I contacted Leeds Radar as I approached Burnley to request a transit of their airspace. As before, I had plotted an avoidance route (via Dewsbury to the South) in readiness for a potential rejection, but the Controller helpfully cleared me through, not above 3400 feet! Now I look back, I suspect this may have been a hint that I had allowed myself do climb a little higher than intended, meaning I was quite close to Manchester’s Class A TMA that was above me at 3500 feet.

Passing over Bradford and Leeds I had to descend for a short while to remain VFR due to a bank of cloud that was ahead of me. I was never below around 2500 feet though, so the cloud base was still perfectly acceptable for VFR flight. Once clear I climbed again to around 3000 feet to give myself more options should I experience any engine issues while over the cities.

Headingley

Headingley

Leeds Bradford Airport

Leeds Bradford Airport

The M1 / A1(M) junction was an easy landmark to spot, and as I approached I signed off with Leeds, and contacted Leeds East to get airfield information. I was informed of wingwalking that was taking place in the overhead, and the radio operator also queried whether I wanted fuel (I had informed them when I called by phone earlier that I would need it). It turned out that they were experiencing an issue with delivery of fuel from their bowser, and he said he would keep me up to date as I approached.

They were operating on runway 34 with a Right Hand circuit, so after a bit of thinking I announced I would position to join Downwind. As I approached I could clearly see the wingwalking aircraft manoeuvring in the overhead, and kept an eye on him as I continued inbound. He announced that he was landing on 06 grass just as I joined Downwind, and was well clear before I came in to land.

Approaching Leeds East (formerly RAF Church Fenton)

Approaching Leeds East (formerly RAF Church Fenton)

Perhaps due to the slight distraction, the landing this time wasn’t great, with a couple of very small bounces occurring, probably due to excess speed on the approach. The runway was 1600 metres long though, so I had plenty of time to get things sorted out, even taking into account the large number of caravans parked at the far end of the runway.

As I rolled out, the radio operator gave me taxy instructions, and I parked up next to the Stearman that I’d been watching as I approached. I walked up to the Tower, and was given the news that the fuel bowser was indeed broken, and the operator enquired as to whether I had sufficient fuel to continue. Knowing that Sherburn-in-Elmet was only a couple of miles to the South, I gave them a quick call to check I could come in for fuel, before heading straight back to the aircraft.

Parked up next to the Stearman wingwalking aircraft

Parked up next to the Stearman wingwalking aircraft

The Stearman pilot was making ready to leave at the same time. having to make a similar hop over to Sherburn for fuel. I got started and taxyed slightly before him, carrying out my power checks on runway 06 before backtracking 34 to get ready to take off. As I announced I was taking to 34, the Stearman announce he was lining up on 06. I was in position first, and after a quick check that the Stearman wasn’t moving, I announced I was taking off and started my takeoff roll. The radio operator checked with the Stearman that he was holding (he was!) and I continued the take off roll. As I became airborne and continued around the circuit to head towards Sherburn, the Stearman took off, and I positioned behind him initially.

I continued the climb up to 2000 feet in readiness for the overhead join at Sherburn, but the Stearman continued at low level off to my left. As I joined overhead at Sherburn he carried out an abbreviated circuit and landed. Not too long after him, I was established on Final, and came in for a nice landing on the grass runway, before rolling out towards the end and taxying up to the pumps. There were two other aircraft already parked near the pumps, so I slotted in around the other side of the pumps and waited for my turn to get fuel.

Stearman escort to Sherburn-in-Elmet

Stearman escort to Sherburn-in-Elmet

Once refuelled, the refuellers helped me pull the Warrior onto the grass parking area, and I headed in to settle the bill for fuel. I had a quick chat to the lady on the desk, double checking my reading of the correct taxy route (all the way down to parallel the hard runway), before heading back to the aircraft to get ready to depart. It was already getting quite late (after 4pm) I decided to abandon the planned stop at Nottingham, and just head straight back to Kemble.

The Stearman carried out his power checks on the grass just ahead of me, and after he took off I waited for another aircraft to complete his touch and go before departing myself. I planned to follow the other aircraft around the circuit, before departing to the West to intercept my planned track from Leeds East down to Sheffield. I had him in sight as I turned Crosswind, but in checking for other traffic before turning Downwind, I managed to temporarily lose sight of him. I soon spotted him slightly ahead and to my left, and was in the process of announcing that I would pass behind him, when he obviously spotted me and climbed to make sure there was no conflict between us.

Once clear of the ATZ, I climbed up to 2500 feet for the first leg, in order to remain below the Leeds airspace above me that started at 3000 feet. I had chosen a waypoint in order to let me know when it was safe to climb, and once clear of the airspace climbed up to around 3000 feet for the leg towards Sheffield. The disused airport there was easy to spot as I approached, and once overhead I turned to track towards Mansfield, my plan being to transit East Midlands airspace to the East side of their Zone.

I was listening out to Doncaster initially, switching to East Midlands as I approached Mansfield. East Midlands seemed quite busy, with a number of commercial aircraft inbound and departing, as well as a few light aircraft either transiting or receiving a service. I waited until a quieter period before making my initial call, and the Controller queried that I was requesting a transit to the East of EME (the NDB some 5nm to the East of the airfield. I confirmed this, and was granted a transit through their airspace, remaining to the East of the NDB, not above 3000 feet. I made a quick adjustment to my route in SkyDemon, removing the waypoint at Nottingham and instead tracking direct to Bruntingthorpe. The transit through the Zone was definitely a much more inviting prospect than the alternative, which was to remain under the Controlled Airspace at an altitude of around 1200 feet.

East Midlands Airport in the haze

East Midlands Airport in the haze

After clearing their airspace, I continued to receive a Basic Service from East Midlands until Bruntingthorpe, signing off and changing to Brize Radar as I passed the airfield. They were now broadcasting a recorded message informing pilots that their LARS service was now closed, and any aircraft wishing to transit Brize should contact them on their ‘Zone’ frequency. I had no such plans however, so instead switched to Wellesbourne to see how busy they were. Surprisingly they were still open, and I heard a number of pilots approaching to land. After the mistake I made last flight in failing to correctly plan the DME arc I flew, this time I had checked beforehand, and determined I could safely fly an anticlockwise 10nm DME arc around the DTY VOR, to intercept the appropriate track from DTY to Chedworth.

Bruntingthorpe

Bruntingthorpe

I flew the majority of this leg tracking the VOR, using the DME to get a feel for when to expect to see Chedworth. Now well clear of Controlled Airspace above me, I climbed up to 4500 feet on this leg, managing to remain well clear of cloud, and still picking up navigation features (including Little Rissington) as I proceeded along the leg.

Passing Little Rissington

Passing Little Rissington

Despite expecting Kemble to be closed by now, I listened out on their frequency to get a feel for the traffic situation as I approached. I heard G-VICC approaching and landing, and as I passed Cirencester another aircraft appeared on frequency flying circuits at Kemble. This at least gave me an idea of which runway to use (08) and as I approached I descended to 2400 feet on the last QNH I was given (Kemble is around 400 feet AMSL) to join overhead.

As I began my descent on the deadside, the other aircraft completed a touch and go, and I got a good view of him off to my right. He appeared to be a microlight of some description, so I expected to have to fly a slightly slower circuit to avoid catching him up. I slotted in behind him on the Downwind leg, lowering a stage of flap to fly slightly slower than normal around the circuit. I completed the before landing checklist while doing so, and had the other aircraft in view as he turned Base. While checking for traffic before turning Base myself, I lost sight of him in the ground clutter, and never managed to find him again. As a result, when I turned Final (and still being unable to see him) I decided to Go Around, turning to track slightly to the left of the runway while trying to find him again.

As I passed the threshold, he announced that he was turning Downwind, and at least I knew which part of the sky to look for him now. I soon became visual with him again, and followed him around for another circuit. Again I had him in sight for the entire circuit, before losing sight of him as he descended on Base and Final. Again concerned about being on Final at around the same time as another aircraft was, I decided to ask the other pilot to report his position, receiving the response that he was just climbing away, and about to turn Crosswind near Kemble Village. Reassured that there was no chance of a conflict, I continued my approach, landing deliberately long for a good final landing of the day. As I turned off the runway on Alpha, I again spotted the other aircraft on late Downwind, before taxying back to our parking area.

I had been making more of an effort to manage my fuel throughout the day, and had been keeping a log of which tank I was using, and the time at which I switched. As a result, on checking the fuel state after landing, found that both tanks were at an almost identical level, right around tabs which at least meant I didn’t have to refuel before putting the aircraft to bed. I pushed it back into its parking space, before replacing the cover and taking all my gear back to the car. I then returned to the aircraft, removed the cover and located my phone, which has dropped down in the gap between the front seats! I headed in to the office to settle up for the flight, before heading home for a well earned beer!

Tracks flown

Tracks flown

Leg 1 profile

Leg 1 profile

Leg 2 profile

Leg 2 profile

Leg 3 profile

Leg 3 profile

Leg 4 profile

Leg 4 profile

Despite my initial misgivings about making such a long flight in the slower Warrior, the flight had actually gone off with pretty much no hitches. I been granted all three Controlled Airspace transits that I’d planned (including a slightly different one over Liverpool that actually worked out better in terms of photo opportunities) and visited two new airfields. In total I’d logged 5 and a half hours of flying, landed at three airfields before returning to Kemble after they had officially closed. The issues at Kemble with losing sight of the other aircraft were a little frustrating, but I think I’d at least made the correct decisions when losing sight of an aircraft that was potentially in close proximity to me. All in all, a truly fantastic day’s flying, hopefully I can make further flights such as this in the future!

 

Total flight time today: 5:35
Total flight time to date: 297:40

To Conington with a breathing ‘autopilot’!

May 7, 2016

I flew with Josh and Vanessa towards the end of last year, and was disappointed that my attempt to take them on a ‘proper’ flight was foiled by a problem with an aircraft, meaning we’d only really been able to go for a quick local. I’d promised that when the opportunity arose, I’d take them for a proper flight. I’d invited them along when I was unaccompanied to Nottingham, but sadly they were busy that day. Another opportunity arose to take them for a flight this weekend, and thankfully the weather and our schedules finally meant that we could go for it.

Initially we planned to fly down to Devon, stopping off at Dunkeswell. However, in the days leading up to the flight, it was announced that a mass photo shoot was to occur at Dunkeswell to celebrate the anniversary of the formation of the LAA. As a result I thought it would be better to choose another destination, if not just because the Cafe there was likely to be very busy!

I finally decided on a trip back to Peterborough Conington, with a possible stop off on the return leg at either Sywell or Leicester. All the planning was completed in advance as normal, and on the morning of the flight I completed the last items of planning and called Conington to ensure all was Ok, which showed that apart from a TopNav competition there was nothing particularly unusual happening. I’d made myself familiar with their slightly unusual Overhead Join procedure (which I’d flown on a previous flight), and collected Josh and Vanessa on my way up to Kemble.

G-EDGI was just preparing to depart as we arrived, and once all the pre-flight paperwork had been completed we walked out to the Arrow. In order to remove the need to get fuel on our trip, we put some more fuel in from Lyneham’s bowser before I completed the ‘A’ check and we all got settled.

Getting ready to depart

Getting ready to depart

Kemble were on 08 today, and rather unusually I was asked to complete my checks on the D site apron. The weather looked almost perfect from the ground, although the forecast warned of a slight chance of thunderstorms later in the day. Due to the fact that the thunderstorms would be infrequent and short lived, I decided it was safe to continue the flight, given that we should be able to spot them easily in an otherwise clear sky, and either fly around them or land somewhere en-route to wait for them to dissipate.

After the checks were completed on the D site apron I expected to be given taxy instructions to either use the Charlie taxyway to the South, or the grass Golf taxyway in front of the tower. My instructions were initially to taxy to Alpha 3 (making the Charlie taxyway seem likely) but on arrival there was told I could backtrack 08. I think this is the first time I’ve done this, and it certainly cut down on taxying time.

After a suitable backtrack, we were cleared to depart, and I asked for information as to whether a left turn out would be possible. There was nothing known to affect this, so we began the takeoff roll and lifted off into the clear blue skies. As is often the case however, the conditions weren’t as good as they looked from the ground. We were soon in a layer of relatively poor visibility, and despite climbing to 3500 feet we didn’t emerge from it.

Once clear of Kemble, we signed off with them and contacted Brize Radar for a Basic Service. They were relatively busy, but we were granted the service and continued en-route. Once established on the leg to the DTY VOR, I handed control to Josh, and he made a good job of maintaining height and heading. As we approached Banbury, I made ready to sign off with Brize, and heard another aircraft being refused a service due to them being at capacity. Fortunately for them, as we signed off, the Brize Controller immediately called them back to offer a service.

Flying selfie!

Flying selfie!

I’m always reticent to fly too close to a VOR, as they are often used by pilots as turning points, and as such can become a choke point for other aircraft. I had decided to fly a 10nm DME arc around DTY, to intercept the outbound course to Conington. I explained this to Josh as I took control, and set about flying the procedure.

In general the arc went pretty well, if a little straight at one point. However, I was never more than about 0.75 nm off my ‘target’ distance from the VOR. As we crossed the 180° radial, I looked out to my left and spotted a runway a couple of miles away. A quick glance at the chart showed that it was Turweston, and at our height of 3500 feet we were well clear of them. However, something clicked in my mind and I took another look at the chart, only to have my fears confirmed as I spotted Hinton in the Hedges directly West of Turweston.

Analysis of my track in SkyDemon shows that I’d inadvertantly flown within a mile or so of their Overhead. Normally at 3500 feet this wouldn’t necessarily be an issue, but Hinton performs parachute dropping (up to 6500 feet according to SkyDemon). As such, there had been a real chance that I could have disrupted their operations while flying past, or even had even more serious consequences.

A definite lesson was learned here, despite ‘planning’ to fly the 10nm DME arc to avoid DTY, I hadn’t actually checked on a chart to see where that track would actually place me. This was probably my most serious omission in flight planning in the entire of my flying career. I’ll definitely be making a point of planning this sort of thing more thoroughly in future.

We continued on past Silverstone, and rather than complete the arc to my planned outbound track, I took another look at the chart for anything else that would prevent us taking a direct track to Conington. Other than a few farm strips on the route, there was nothing of note, so I entered a ‘direct to’ into the 430 and SkyDemon, set us up on the appropriate heading and handed control back to Josh.

Passing Silverstone

Passing Silverstone

Again (as the track shows) Josh made an excellent job of maintaining height and heading. In order to try and get out of the haze, I had Josh drop us down to 2500 feet, and this did help slightly with forward visibility. I tuned in to Conington’s frequency to listen in as we approached, and highlighted the identifying features of Conington to Josh to see if he could spot it as we approached.

We passed over the A14, and spotted the A1(M) off to our right, making it easy to know where the airfield should be. It took a little while to actually pick out the runway in the haze however. Conington were still operating on 10 with a left hand circuit, which meant I’d have to fly almost a complete circuit of the airfield in the overhead before commencing the descent on the Deadside.

I kept to the East of the railway line as their noise abatement circuit requested, but almost forgot about the village to the South West of the airfield that is also marked to be avoided. I jinked slightly right to avoid it as we descended on the Deadside, before continuing into the circuit. We were the only aircraft on frequency as we continued around, and I brought us in for a gentle if slightly flat landing. We were asked to park on the grass as we cleared the runway, and after shutting down got a few photos before walking in for lunch.

Happy passengers

Happy passengers

The cafe was busy, with lots of people sitting at tables poring over charts, presumably preparing for the Navigation competition that was happening. We found a seat outside and ate in glorious sunshine, watching aircraft arriving and departing as we did so.

Once we’d finished, we were walking out to the aircraft when a familiar sounding voice hailed me, and as I looked up I saw Graham walking over to say hello. Graham had flown with Lyneham Flying Club also, and had even arranged a Navigation Competition for us at one point. He was here today to compete in the TopNav competition himself, and after we caught up a little he bade goodbye to go and complete his own flight planning!

After a quick walkaround, we all boarded the aircraft and I got the engine started. We held for a short while as Freedom’s G-CLEA taxyed in front of us, before backtracking the runway (almost 1km long!) to carry out our power checks on the crosswind runway. Once these were complete, we took to the runway and departed. I took care to fly the noise abatement circuit as well as I could, initially flying East of the railway line, before heading North far enough to pass over the lake on the Downwind leg.

I announced we were climbing out on Downwind, and proceed South West to track direct to DTY for the first leg. I climbed to about 3000 feet for this leg, getting us established on course and at the correct height before again handing control over to Josh. We had a discussion on the operation of the trim, and I made a slight correction for him before pointing out the trim wheel between the seats to that he could make his own corrections later should they be required.

Josh at the controls

Josh at the controls

Having Josh along as ‘autopilot’ meant I could spend my time looking out for other traffic, although the poor visibility was still present which made this difficult. I spoke briefly to Sywell as we passed just above their ATZ, before signing off with them to continue with Brize after we’d passed by.

Vanessa spotted a Cessna quite close off to our right, passing slightly below us, and as we approached Northampton we discussed the route back to Kemble. I decided to route via RAF Brize Norton, with a view to either carrying out a Zone Transit, or climbing above their airspace if this couldn’t be accomodated.

As we reached Northampton, I eyeballed a course change using the chart, and had Josh turn on an appropriate heading to fly over Silverstone. From there (mindful of my earlier faux-pas) I planned to head due West to Banbury, before continuing on course for Brize. Josh flew the assigned headings well, and I updated the heading occasionally on the heading bug as we progressed.

Once overhead Banbury, I contacted Brize Radar to request a Basic Service and Zone Transit. I was immediately asked to call Brize Zone for the transit, so we switched frequency and signed on with them, requesting a routing via their overhead to the mast at Membury, then back to Kemble via Swindon. We were initially provided with a Basic Service, and after a few minutes were granted a Zone Transit on our requested route, with no altitude restrictions.

I had Josh descend to 2500 feet to get a better view of the airfield as we passed, and dialled in a ‘direct to’ EGVN on the 430 and turned in the ADF to Brize’s NDB frequency. Monitoring our progress on the chart, I realised we would be passing very close to Enstone at just above Overhead Join height, so after spotting it ahead of us had Josh adjust course to the West to avoid it. We then continued towards Brize, keeping it on the right hand side of the aircraft so that Josh and Vanessa could get a good view as we passed.

Once overhead, we steered almost due South and tried to spot Membury in the murk ahead. I pointed out Faringdon, the A419 and the mainline railway as we passed over, and soon spotted the M4 off to our right, followed by the mast itself a few moments later. We had heard Redlands Para on frequency earlier, and the Controller at Brize reminded us that Redlands was active, so we tracked to the South of the M4 back towards Swindon, passing by the disused airfield at Wroughton, and spotting Lyneham off in the distance as we passed Swindon.

I have Josh a course to head direct towards Kemble, then revised it slightly to try to remain clear of Oaksey as we approached. Kemble soon came into view, and after signing on with them had Josh approach the airfield to fly over the threshold of 08, and descend to 2000 feet on the Kemble QFE in readiness for the overhead join.

Approaching Kemble

Approaching Kemble

We passed by Oaksey, and as we approached the overhead I took control back from Josh, and set about looking for the other aircraft that were operating in the circuit. We spotted one on Final for a touch and go, and as I descended on the Deadside we all tried to spot him. Josh was first to spot him, pointing him out to me as we turned Crosswind and continued around the circuit.

Pre-landing checks were all completed in good time, but I hadn’t fully appreciated the fact that the aircraft ahead of us was actually a microlight, and as such we caught him up a little on the Downwind leg. As we turned Base he was only just turning Final, so I lowered flap and slowed us down to try to increase the spacing between us.

He was on very short Final as we turned Final, and I expected to be forced to Go Around as a result. We watched the aircraft ahead land and roll out, and he seemed to take an age to get airborne again, but fortunately did so as we descended through about 150 feet, receiving a late ‘Land at your discretion’ call from the FISO.

The second landing of the day was much better than the first, and as we rolled out I heard the FISO clear another aircraft into position behind us. Eager to avoid holding him up for too long (and mindful of the fact the he couldn’t see us due to the hump in the runway) I kept the speed up so as to vacate as soon as possible at the far end of the runway. As we crossed the hold line, I reported ‘Runway Vacated’, enabling the FISO to immediately clear the other aircraft to depart.

After completing the ‘After landing’ checklist at the hold, I checked Josh could reach the rudder pedals Ok, and allowed him to taxy along Alpha towards Lyneham’s parking area. Again he did an excellent job, and I took control back from him before we reached the parking area so that I could make the tight turn to position us at the fuel bowser ready to refuel.

Josh and Vanessa chatted while I refuelled the aircraft, then we all pushed it back to its parking space and put the cover back on after removing all our gear from the aircraft. After settling up all the post-flight paperwork in the office, we headed back to the car and had just arrived back in Swindon when the heavens opened and the forecast thunderstorms and hail arrived!

Tracks flown

Tracks flown

Leg 1 profile

Leg 1 profile

Leg 2 profile

Leg 2 profile

We’d had a really enjoyable flight today, and again the perfect-looking conditions from the ground turned out to actually be quite poor once we were in the air. Josh and Vanessa had been very enthusiastic passengers, and Josh showed good aircraft control during his time at the controls. I was very disappointed at my slip regarding flying near Hinton, and resolved in future to ensure that all phases of flight were thoroughly planned in advance. It was nice to be back at Conington, and good to see it so busy. Although my flying year only started at the end of Februrary, I’m already on track to easily match the hours flown last year. Hopefully I can continue with regular flights for the remainder of the year!

Total flight time today: 2:05
Total flight time to date: 292:05

More new blood, and a new airfield

April 23, 2016

While arranging to donate a flight in aid of Catrin’s school PTA, the chair of the PTA mentioned that his 16 year old son was planning to join the RAF to train as a pilot. He asked if there was any chance I would be able to take him up for a flight so that he could see what to expect. Having already done something similar for Josh, I had agreed, and spare seats in the aircraft for a flight seemed the perfect opportunity.

Hawarden had long been on my list of airfields to visit, as (most importantly!) their cafe seems to have a good reputation. Also, as it’s an airfield used by Airbus, there was a good chance of getting up close with their Beluga transport aircraft. I’d seen this from the ground when driving in the area, and was keen for a (slightly) closer look. As it happened, I follow Rocky on Twitter, who works in Air Traffic there, and he was a very useful resource in the days leading up to the flight.

A haircut appointment in the morning meant a slightly later start than usual, but I collected Thomas and his mum Juliette from their house in Swindon around 10:30, and we headed to the airfield. As usual, the planning was all completed the night before with final touches made on the morning of the flight, leaving me to just double check the AIS information line for any last minute airspace upgrades, and phone Hawarden to receive PPR.

The Club office was quite busy with a pilot preparing to take a number of passengers on flights in the Bulldog, so while Thomas and Juliette completed the Temporary Membership forms, I completed the tech log of the Arrow. I had given us the option of returning via a stop off at Caernarfon if time permitted, so I left the second line of the tech log largely blank so that I could complete it once I knew where we’d actually gone!

We all headed out to the aircraft, with Thomas and Juliette helping me remove the cover before Thomas followed me around the aircraft on the walkaround, as I pointed out the various items I was checking. As usual there were no problems (with the exception of a non-working landing light), so we all boarded the aircraft ready to depart.

The engine started on the second try, and we received our taxy instructions which took us onto the Southern taxyway in readiness to depart on runway 08. I explained the various checks I was carrying out as we taxyed, before carrying out the normal power checks once the engine had warmed up. As I moved into position at the hold to announce ‘ready for departure’, I spotted another aircraft on late Downwind, but judged I had enough time to take to the runway and depart without affecting his approach.

Helpfully, the Controller informed me that there was nothing he knew of to affect a left turn out, before we began to accelerate down the runway. There was a fairly stiff crosswind from the left, meaning the initial climb out had a fair amount of crab required to maintain runway track. I raised the gear as we climbed out, turning towards Gloucester and continuing to climb up to our planned cruising altitude of 4500 feet.

Once clear to the North, I signed off with Kemble and made contact with Gloucester to receive a Basic Service as I normally do when passing close to them. They seemed relatively quiet, with just a couple of other aircraft on frequency. We reported overhead, and then continued on towards Great Malvern where I signed off with Gloucester.

A bit of 'instruction'

A bit of ‘instruction’

I’d already briefed Thomas regarding him taking control during the flight, and on the leg towards Great Malvern I gave him control, giving him a brief introduction as to what he needed to do in terms of maintaining height and heading using external references. He did a good job considering it was his first experience at the controls, and in particular I noted that he wasn’t making the usual ‘rookie’ mistake of trying to correct every slight deviation from straight and level. We were experiencing fairly regular but minor turbulence, which caused us to be bounced around a number of time while he was at the controls. However, he took good heed of my hint not to try to maintain a death grip on the control column, and generally allowed the aircraft to settle itself back into equilibrium rather than continually making minor corrections on the controls.

Thomas at the controls

Thomas at the controls

Thomas handed control back to be after a few minutes, and we continued on towards Shrewsbury. Shawbury was easily visible off to the right hand side, and I signed on with Sleap as we approached. They were relatively quiet, and as we were up at 4500 feet there was no real need to talk to them. However, I let them know I was passing overhead. before later signing off in readiness to approach Hawarden. The visibility was excellent, with Wrexham and Chester clearly visible in the distance, and even this far away it was easy to make out the coast and the water beyond.

After passing Sleap, I began a gradual descent in order to be below the Class A airspace that sits above Hawarden, starting at 3000 feet. I levelled off at 2500 feet, and after copying down the ATIS made contact with Hawarden as we approached Wrexham. For some reason I wasn’t ready to write down the information they passed to me, meaning that I got the last digit of the transponder code wrong as I read it back and entered it into the transponder. The Controller corrected me, and as I finished entering it I realised that the transponder was actually still in Standby mode, I had obviously forgotten to turn it on before leaving Kemble!

With the transponder code correctly set, I was given a Right Base join to Hawarden’s runway 04. I continued the descent down to 1000 feet after setting QFE, and carried out the before landing checklist as we approached. Now talking to the Tower, I was initially a little high as I neared the point to call ‘Base’, but by the time I was on Final this had changed to being a little low. There were no other aircraft on frequency, and the wind check gave an almost 90 degree crosswind of around 11 knots. Mindful of the slightly challenging conditions, I decided to stick with just 2 stages of flap, and brought us in to land. The landing was slightly floaty (probably not helped by only using two stages of flap) and this meant I spent more time in the holdoff trying to maintain the correct alignment and attitude. The landing was slightly firm, but fortunately not so bad that it would scare my first time passengers!

Short Final at Hawarden

Short Final at Hawarden

As we vacated the runway as instructed, another aircraft was cleared on to the far end of the runway (the ATIS had warned that runway 22 could be expected for departure), and I made a point of stopping past the hold line to carry out the after landing checklist and study the taxy diagram to ensure I could follow the relatively complex instructions to the parking area. Sadly there was no sign of the Beluga, and it later turned out that it had headed off to Spain instead! The AIP entry suggests that all aircraft must be marshalled into their parking area, and at first I couldn’t see anyone waiting for us. Someone emerged from a hangar as we approached, and gave me clear (but largely un-necessary beyond the first ‘park there’) instructions.

I had to consciously resist the urge to head towards the marshaller while he gave the ‘proceed ahead’ instruction, as he sent me past his position before turning through 180 degrees into the area he wanted me to park. After shutting down, we were given a pass to get back through the gate airside, and he gave us directions to head to the nearby airport cafe. We made the short walk to the cafe, and then found ourselves a table that hadn’t already been reserved. The cafe seemed to be fairly busy with non-pilots, which is always a good sign.

I played safe with my usual sausage sandwich, while the others had something a little more substantial. We chatted about Thomas’s planned route into the RAF, and discussed what type of flying he’d like to do. While eating I checked with Rocky on Twitter, receiving a favourable review of my approach and landing from the vantage point of ATC.

Once we’d all finished eating, we walked back towards the hangar near where we were parked, in order to book out with Air Traffic before leaving. It turned out to be Rocky on the other end of the phone, so we had a brief chat after giving him our departure details. After a quick check with the staff in the hangar as to whether start clearance was required (he said not, but to ensure to copy the ATIS before initial contact with ATC), we walked back to the Arrow and I carried out a quick transit check. Finding no problems, we all got back on board and I got the engine started after a couple of tries.

ATIS copied, I made contact with ATC, and was given the option as to which runway I wanted to depart on. The wind was almost straight across, but actually slightly favoured 04. However, this would have meant a long taxy to the far end, as well as starting us off on our return journey pointing the wrong way (we wanted to head South) so I decided to accept the slight tailwind and take off on 22. We were given taxy instructions to the hold, and I carried out the power checks as we approached.

Once these were complete, I then had to copy down my first ‘real’ departure clearance in a long time. While I was based at Brize Norton and then Lyneham, this was just a normal part of the process of going flying, but having been based at Kemble for nearly 5 years means that the need for a departure clearance is a rare occurrence. The clearance was given as “G-AZWS, line up and wait runway 22. After departure standard noise abatement before a left turn VFR not above altitude 1,500, squawk 4601”. I thought I’d read all this back correctly, but the Controller had me clarify that I had heard the ‘not above altitude 1,500’ part.

This was to be my undoing a little later, but once the clearance had been read back correctly, I was immediately cleared to takeoff. The noise abatement mentioned required us to maintain runway heading for 1.5nm DME, before turning on track. I carried out a relatively straightfoward takeoff, making an appropriate into-wind correction as we climbed out. Rocky was sitting in his car in the car park, and got a nice shot of us departing.

Departure captured from the ground

Departure captured from the ground

I was handed over to the Approach frequency, and I signed on as I remembered doing at Lyneham with ‘Hawarden Approach, G-AZWS with you. Airborne check passing 1000 feet’. The Controller’s response was a little unexpected: ‘No squawk seen, reset transponder’. As I looked over to check the code, I realised that again I had correctly entered the code, but not actually turned the transponder on!

When given the departure clearance, I had interpreted the altitude restriction to mean that I had to make the turn onto track before reaching 1500 feet. However, in hindsight it was obvious that this was actually a request to remain below 1500 feet as we departed, before being cleared higher. The reason for this restriction became clear as we heard another aircraft inbound, being vectored for the ILS to runway 04. This could potentially have put us into direct conflict with him. As I made the turn onto track, I continued to climb to 2500 to keep below the Class A airspace above, and easily spotted Wrexham off in the distance. The Controller made no mention of my slip in not maintaining the assigned altitude, I only realised when reviewing the GPS logs, and confirmed my mistake while talking to Rocky.

Another aircraft was no on frequency, operating North of the field, and as we passed Bangor on Dee Racecourse I began a climb up to our cruising altitude of 5500 feet, notifying the Controller that we were doing so. We started to receive traffic reports of an aircraft off to our left, which the Controller thought was the parachuting aircraft operating out of Tilstock. The Controller continued to pass the other aircraft’s position and altitude to us (at one point he was at 6000 feet and climbing, while we were still climbing through 4000 feet to stop at 5500) but we never made visual contact with him. Eventually the Controller informed us that the other aircraft had turned back towards the East, presumably to begin running in to drop his passengers over Tilstock.

We levelled off at 5500 feet, passing close by Sleap but not bothering to contact them this time. Again, I handed over control to Thomas for a while, and he made a really good job of keeping us on track and relatively level. At one point was passed through an area that generated a large amount of lift, and we were quickly popped up by 200 or 300 feet. Thomas took this in his stride however, gently correcting for the extra lift, and gradually bringing us back down to our cruising altitude.

Around this point I took a quick look at the display on the 430, and was surprised to see an indicated ground speed of well over 150 knots. Examining the GPS logs from SkyDemon shows that we actually peaked at a ground speed of some 170 knots, not bad for an aircraft with a cruising airspeed of about 125 knots! As we continued I was quite late in spotting a glider ahead of us and at a similar level, as he became more noticeable as he started a steep turn to the left (possibly because he had seen us slightly before I spotted him and decided to take action to increase the distance between us).

150 knots ground speed!

150 knots ground speed!

We continued to pass through patches of moderate turbulence, so we descended by 500 feet or so to see if this put us into clearer air. It didn’t make an awful lot of difference though, but the turbulence was fairly infrequent, and not too bad so as to cause us any real concerns. I asked Thomas and Juliette whether they would prefer us to return either via the Severn Bridges, or Swindon in order to try to get some photos of their house. They chose Swindon, so I continued on our planned route rather than heading further West to go via the River Severn.

Glorious conditions for flying

Glorious conditions for flying

We could clearly hear transmissions to and from Gloucester from around 70nm away, and I signed on with them around Great Malvern, only to be asked to ‘Standby’. Once the Controller called us back, we received a Basic Service from them, initially being asked to report West Abeam before telling him that we were routing through Gloucester’s overhead. Gloucester were relatively quiet, with only a few other aircraft on frequency, and after we reported Overhead and continued South, I began a descent to get us down to a lower level in order to get some photos over Swindon.

We followed the A417 / A419 as it headed from Gloucester via Cirencester to Swindon, pointing out South Cerney off to our right and Fairford to our left. We were down to around 2000 feet as we approached Swindon, and I set about finding some landmarks in order to orient myself. Asda Walmart was the first one I spotted, followed by the old Renault Building and the Link Centre. I headed towards Catrin’s school, which put is in the general area of Thomas’s house, and carried out a right hand orbit oriented on Ramleaze Village Centre, allowing Juliette and Thomas to identify their house.

Once the orbit was complete, I quickly worked out a track to Kemble, before making contact with them to find out they were still operating from runway 08. From our current position, it was easy to set up for an Overhead Join, and there was little other traffic on frequency as we approached (much different to my last flight!). Once overhead, I lowered the gear and descended on the Deadside, joining the Downwind leg at the appropriate point in the noise abatement circuit. A transmission from the ground prevented me from making the Downwind call at the appropriate point, so I called ‘Late Downwind’ as soon as the frequency was clear.

The Base and Final legs were straightforward, but again the wind was almost directly across the runway, so I continued with just 2 stages of flap. This resulted in another slightly floaty landing, this time a little firmer than the last. We continued along the runway to vacate on Alpha, before taxying back and shutting down. Thomas and Juliette helped me refuel and push the Arrow back into its parking space, before we all put the cover on and headed back into the Club. After all the post flight paperwork was completed, we headed back to the car before driving back to Swindon.

Despite a fairly slow start to the year (no flying until the last weekend in February) I’d now completed my third day of flying before the end of April. It was great to be able to introduce another couple of people to the joys of flying in light aircraft, and hopefully the experience will help reinforce Thomas’s desire to continue to become a pilot. I’d also added a further airfield to the logbook, and coped with some fairly challenging conditions during the flight. The slips with the transponder were a little frustrating (particularly as I made the same mistake twice in the same day) but in general the flight had been carried out without too must trouble. Hopefully now I can continue to fly regularly for the rest of the year!

Tracks flown

Tracks flown

Leg 1 profile

Leg 1 profile

Leg 2 profile

Leg 2 profile

Total flight time today: 2:40
Total flight time to date: 290:00

Back to Nottingham, all alone

March 25, 2016

After a late start to this year’s flying with a Currency Check, I was determined to try to fly more regularly. Having lots of plans for April meant that finding a weekend to fly would be difficult, so I decided to try and take advantage of the Easter Weekend by booking the Arrow on consecutive days. The initial plan was to fly on the first day with David, and then to take the family flying on the second.

As the date neared however, it became clear that the weather wasn’t going to cooperate. While the forecast for Good Friday suggested excellent flying conditions, the forecast for the following day promised almost exactly the opposite. David contacted me a few days before the planned flight to ask if it was Ok for him to reschedule, and carry out another flight on Good Friday. This worked out well, meaning I could move the planned family flight forward a day, hopefully taking advantage of the good forecast weather conditions.

Keen to make a good impression, I planned a flight to the relatively familiar destination of Nottingham (an airfield I’d already visited solo in July 2013, and with the family in June 2014). Catrin is starting to take an interest in Theme Parks and roller coasters, so to keep her interested I decided to fly a more circuitous route back to Kemble, showing her some of the attractions at Alton Towers.

Sadly we had to change these plans at the last minute, as Catrin developed a fairly severe cough on the morning of the planned flight. I tried to contact a few prospective passengers to see if I could arrange some company at short-notice, but unfortunately wasn’t able to find anyone. It had been a little while since I had flown completely solo, and it seemed like today’s flight was going to be just me in the aircraft.

As usual, I completed the final planning for the flight early in the morning, contacting Nottingham before I left for Kemble. I had planned to route back via Halfpenny Green’s overhead, and decided to consider landing there if time permitted. I carefully completed the pre-flight paperwork on arriving at Kemble, before walking out to the aircraft to carry out the ‘A’ check. There were no issues detected, so I took a bit of time to arrange my gear in the aircraft, before getting ready to start up.

We’ve been instructed to request clearance from the FISO to start at Kemble, as our parking area is out of sight of the Tower. I requested this as usual, and received the unusual response of ‘at your discretion’. It was possible there’d been a change in policy, so I resolved to check up on this later. The engine started on the first try, and I took some time to enter my route into the Garmin 430 before requesting clearance to taxy. Kemble were operating from runway 26 today, meaning a relatively straightforward taxy to A1 for power checks. As usual these were completed without issue, and I watched another Lyneham aircraft depart as I pulled up to the hold and announced I was ready to depart.

Another Lyneham aircraft departing ahead of me

Another Lyneham aircraft departing ahead of me

I took my turn on the runway, performing a normal takeoff, and continuing around the circuit to climb away on the Downwind leg after checking for joining traffic. I then set course to my usual first turning point at the Chedworth disused airfield, setting up the aircraft for cruise after levelling out at around 4500 feet. Sadly I neglected to lean the mixture at this point, something I realised somewhat later on! The visbility was excellent after the recent rain, and it was easy to pick out landmarks as I turned towards my next turning point at the DTY VOR. A quick check of the chart showed Controlled Airspace several miles ahead of me at 4500 feet, so I descended to 4000 feet in order to pass well below it.

Beautiful flying conditions

Beautiful flying conditions

I signed on with Brize Radar for a Basic Service, and initially had some difficulty. After responding to the standard ‘pass your message’ request, I was given a squawk, but was unable to make out the last digit. I asked the Controller to ‘say again squawk’, and then had to repeat this a minute or so later as I received no response. I also didn’t receive any confirmation that I was on a Basic Service, which is unusual as Brize can generally be relied on to give a good service.

I received little further contact from the Controller as I continued, and he seemed keen to have me switch to Coventry as I approached Banbury. I changed frequency as requested, signing on with Coventry to receive a Basic Service from them. As usual I didn’t want to turn directly overhead the DTY VOR (they are often used by pilots as a turning point, so it seemed prudent to avoid being in the same location as other pilots who might also be concentrating on making the turn to their next leg rather than looking out). I attempted to fly a 5 DME arc around the DTY VOR, but this was a little messy. Perhaps in hindsight I should have tried to do this somewhat further out, meaning the course corrections were much further apart.

The leg heading North from DTY was relatively straightforward, the navigation helped by the fact that I was simply tracking an outbound radial from the VOR. Coventry gave good service passing information about traffic heading in the same direction, and I listened in to someone practising holds before starting to the fly the procedural ILS into Coventry.

I had planned to request a Zone Transit of East Midlands Controlled Airspace on my way to Nottingham (Nottingham lies beneath one of their areas of airspace), so as I approached Bruntingthorpe I signed off with Coventry in order to contact East Midlands to negotiate the transit. I passed all my details to the Controller, and continued towards their airspace, passing close by Leicester Airfield as I headed North. I started to become a little concerned as I approached, as I still hadn’t received the magic ‘Cleared into Controlled Airspace’ from the Controller. I eventually had to prompt him that I was just a couple of miles from the Zone Boundary (only a minute or so flying time in the Arrow) before I was eventually cleared on a direct track to Nottingham at my current level.

Passing Bruntingthorpe

Passing Bruntingthorpe

Thanks to the excellent visibility, it was easy to spot my destination ahead in the distance. I was still up at around 4000 feet, and again became a little concerned that the Controller wasn’t offering me a descent or frequency change. Around 3nm from Nottingham I prompted him with a ‘3nm miles to run, field in sight, request frequency change to Nottingham’. This received a ‘Oh, are you inbound to Nottingham?’ from the Controller, to which I responded ‘Affirm’. He immediately cleared me to descend, but asked me to remain on frequency for the time being. I was already overhead the Nottingham ATZ before I was eventually cleared to change frequency, and my initial call to Nottingham Radio was made as I was setting up for the Overhead Join to their runway 27.

Descending deadside at Nottingham

Descending deadside at Nottingham

The descent on the Deadside was flown nicely, but while doing my best to follow Nottingham’s noise abatement circuit, I allowed my Downwind leg to be flown at a slight offset to the runway. The Base and Final turns were made at the appropriate points, and I brought the aircraft in for a nice gentle touchdown, rolling out to the turnoff onto the link taxyway that is used for parking at Nottingham.

I had already decided to fill up with fuel at Nottingham (which helpfully waived their normal reasonably priced landing fee) so pulled up behind a Cessna and shut down, just as he was pushed out of the way of the pumps. The refueller helped me push the aircraft back to a parking space once the tanks were full, and I headed in to the Tower to settle the fuel bill before going to the very busy cafe for some lunch. It took a little while to be served, but my sausage and bacon sandwich arrived quite quickly afterwards, and as I tucked in a regular flow of new customers passed through the cafe, always a good sight to see.

Parked up at Nottingham

Parked up at Nottingham

As I had planned to depart Nottingham to the North, I dug out the noise abatement charts I had prepared to see if a departure directly to the North would be appropriate. I couldn’t really come to a decision, so instead decided to fly an abbreviated circuit on departure, climbing out on the Downwind leg before turning directly to the North. I had to be careful not to climb up into East Midlands’ airspace above the airfield, meaning I would need to stop my climb at 2000 feet or so until a few miles North of the airfield.

Back out at the aircraft, I carried out an abbreviated walkaround, taking care to take fuel samples to ensure that there was no contamination in the fuel I had just taken on. I did have to take 3 samples from the Starboard wing tank, as the first 2 showed signs of water. The third was completely clear however, so it was probably just some moisture than had condensed in the tank. Otherwise, the walkround was normal, so I boarded the Arrow and set about getting the engine started. It took a couple of attempts to get going, before I received the airfield information from the Radio operator and taxyed towards the hold for runway 27 to carry out the power checks.

The checks were normal, and after a landing aircraft passed me I entered the runway to backtrack to the threshold. Once the other aircraft was clear of the runway I began my takeoff roll, taking care to make an early turn before reaching the built up area immediately ahead of the runway. As planned I climbed out on the Downwind leg, before informing the Radio operator that I was turning North. Another aircraft reported that he was inbound from that direction, a couple of hundred feet below me, and after a couple of minutes I saw him pass quite close by off the port side.

I used the OBS feature of the 430 to intercept a Westerly course towards the TNT VOR, ensuring that I was well clear of East Midlands’ airspace before climbing up to around 3000 feet. Initially I just listened in to the East Midlands Approach frequency, but when I heard another aircraft report that they were heading towards the TNT VOR also, I announced myself on frequency to make the other aircraft aware of my position and level.

Once I reached the VOR, I dialled in the appropriate radial (as displayed on SkyDemon’s plog) in order to head towards Alton Towers. Given the excellent conditions, the Theme Park was easy to spot from some distance away, and as I approached I carried out a right hand orbit around the park, enabling me to get some good photos as I passed.

Alton Towers

Alton Towers

Once heading in the correct direction again, I spotted my next turning point at Stafford in the distance, and as I approached I signed off with the East Midlands Controller. I was now heading on a direct track for Halfpenny Green, but had decided not to land there, merely using it as an easy turning point. I listened in to the Cosford Approach frequency as I passed, hearing an inbound aircraft orbiting away from the field to allow a glider to land, before heading in to land himself. A further aircraft was on frequency passing several miles to the South of Cosford, and as I passed by I switched to the Halfpenny Green frequency to make contact before passing through their overhead.

Although up at 3000 feet I was above their ATZ and hence not required to contact them, it seemed prudent to do so, in case they knew of other traffic that might affect my flight. As I passed overhead, I spotted another aircraft approaching to land, and continued South towards my planned next turning point at Worcester. A quick check of the time suggested I was in no rush, so I decided to make a late change to my plans and instead head further South than originally planned to approach Kemble from the West.

Mindful of the fact that I tend to lean on SkyDemon when flying these days, I decided to keep my kneeboard firmly closed for the remainder of the flight, picking out landmarks on the ground and using the chart in my lap to eyeball a route via Great Malvern and the Severn Bridges. As I passed West of Worcester I made contact with Gloucester to inform them of my routing, and this also enabled me to hear other traffic talking to them, giving me a better picture of any traffic around me. I reported West Abeam as requested, before signing off as I approached the bends in the river Severn just to the North of the bridges.

Approaching the River Severn

Approaching the River Severn

I clipped the edge of the bird sanctuary as I passed by, turning back towards Kemble as I approached the Old Severn Bridge. I monitored Bristol Radar for a few miles, hearing the Lyneham aircraft I had followed onto the runway this morning reporting near Filton on his way back to Kemble. I must have overtaken him as we approached, as when I switched to Kemble and signed in I heard him reporting behind me a few minutes later.

Approaching Kemble

Approaching Kemble

It was obvious that many pilots were also taking advantage of the excellent conditions, as at one point the FISO reported the following traffic information to another inbound aircraft: “3 in, 5 joining, 6 departing”. The FISO was certainly working hard responding to everyone on the radio, and I did my best to keep my transmissions as succinct as possible. As I descended on the Deadside I was asked to report Crosswind, and had to ‘butt in’ on an aircraft on the Ground in order to report my position. My Downwind call was also somewhat late, and as I turned Base the FISO cleared another aircraft onto the runway ahead of me.

Initially I couldn’t see the aircraft, but spotted it as I turned Final. I reported my position as I continued my descent, and was getting very close to having to go around as I waited for the aircraft ahead to roll and take off. I decided to continue rather than abort the approach, slowing slightly (but keeping a watchful eye on my airspeed) and aiming to land long in order to give the departing aircraft time to clear the runway. I was on the verge of announcing that I was going around when the aircraft ahead became airborne, and the FISO told me ‘With the gear, land your discretion’. I continued and came in for another gentle landing, and had already decided not to request a backtrack in order to prevent holding up any other aircraft landing behind me.

The FISO told me to ‘vacate onto Charlie’, and I cleared the runway as quickly as I could, before taxying on the South side back towards our parking area. Once I reached the hold at C1, I waited for a suitable break on the radio after the Lyneham Warrior had landed, before reporting ready to cross. I was asked to ‘expedite cross 26 onto Alpha’ and followed the instruction. I passed by a glider parked on the grass, with a tug aircraft alongside preparing to tow him back to wherever he should have landed, before following the other Lyneham aircraft back to the parking area and shutting down. Given the congestion on the frequency, I thought in this instance that omitting the usual ‘closing down’ call would be prudent!

Glider with tug aircraft alongside

Glider with tug aircraft alongside

The other pilot helped me push the Arrow into a parking space, and in turn I helped him push his aircraft up to the bowser to refuel, before returning to the Arrow to sort out my gear and put the cover back on. After helping the other pilot to cover the Warrior, we both headed into the Club to complete our paperwork. While chatting to him I learned that he had to abandon his initial plan to fly up to North Wales after encountering low cloud on the route from Haverfordwest to the North. He ended up returning via a coastal route.

Tracks flown

Tracks flown

Leg 1 profile

Leg 1 profile

Leg 2 profile

Leg 2 profile

Despite the disappointment of not being able to bring the family along on this flight, I still managed to have a very enjoyable day’s flying. Unusually my interactions with some of the Controllers had been a little difficult, but nothing that prevented me from completing the flight safely. I’d also taken the opportunity to brush up on my visual navigation skills, and to cap it all had handled the very busy environment on returning to Kemble without any difficulty. Obviously last year’s patchy flying hasn’t eroded the skills too much!

Total flight time today: 2:55
Total flight time to date: 287:20

Currency check, but with some real flying

February 28, 2016

A particularly busy January and February meant I didn’t have much opportunity to fly, and sadly the one attempt I made had to be cancelled due to the onset of a head cold on the morning of the planned flight. As such, I hadn’t flown since November and yet again that meant the need for another Club currency check. Unusually though, I was even out of my 90 day passenger carrying currency requirement, meaning that the flight would have to be with an Instructor rather than just a pilot authorised to carry out Club Currency checks.

Fortunately, Kev (the Arrow’s owner) had recently gained his CRI rating, meaning that he was entitled to carry out the check. I always enjoy flying with Kev, and while his tendency to push you when carrying out Currency checks really makes you work hard (and this trait showed no sign of abating during this days flying!) you always finish a days flying with him feeling like you’ve pushed your personal envelope a little further than before.

I didn’t want this to be just a regular local currency check with a bit of general handling thrown in, so we planned to visit Henstridge (a new airfield for me). This is a fairly short flight from Kemble, so I also opted to drop in to Dunkeswell (always a favourite destination of mine).

The weather conditions on the day before the flight couldn’t have been more perfect, and the forecast on the evening before suggested we should be in for a good day’s flying also. As usual, I completed the majority of my planning the night before, leaving me to print out plogs, mark out the chart and give Henstridge a call before heading off to the airfield.

I carried out the ‘A’ check on the Arrow while waiting for Kev to arrive, and met in him the Club with his young daughter Bronnan (about the same age as Catrin, and also a fairly seasoned flyer!). We checked through the planning I had done before completing the final paperwork and heading out to the aircraft.

With Bronnan safely secured in the back, the ‘Crew’ isolation button on the audio panel was put to good use as we carried out the pre-flight checks. We negotiated some circuits with the FISO, before being given our taxy clearance via the Charlie taxyway to the hold for runway 08. We waited for a short while for the engine to warm up before completing the power checks (watching a student in a Helicopter practising hover-taxying on the grass ahead and to our right), before heading to the hold and reporting that we were ready.

Before takeoff checks

Before takeoff checks

I had decided to carry out a couple of circuits before departing Kemble to ensure I could still remember how to land, and also so that I could reset my 90 day passenger currency in the first flight of the day. We backtracked a little before taking off on 08 just after a Helicopter took off to the right with a student on a solo flight. As I climbed out I heard the FISO report our position to another aircraft, adding ‘the aircraft on upwind will be departing to the South’. I reminded him that we were actually remaining in the circuit, leading to an amusing response that he knew that, but was obviously having trouble reading his own writing!

I mis-identified one of the ‘avoid’ areas on Kemble’s noise abatement circuit, meaning that the Downwind leg was flown a lot wider than it should have been. The pre-landing checks were completed on this leg without difficulty, and I turned Base a little later than normal (perhaps confused a little by the fact that I was wider out than I should have been).

A rather wide Right Base for 08!

A rather wide Right Base for 08!

I over-corrected for the Crosswind to the left when lining up on Final, meaning I had to make a slight correction to the left to get us aligned properly. The remainder of the approach went well, but we started to experience a little turbulence down around 50-100 feet above the ground. It took me a little while to get this sorted out, and I brought us in for a nice gentle first landing of the day.

On the next circuit I decided to leave the gear down, and made a much better job of positioning the Downwind leg at the correct distance from the runway. I got slightly distracted carrying out the pre-landing checks, allowing myself to drift closer in to the runway on the remainder of the Downwind leg, but corrected this once I noticed. This distraction meant I had neglected to make the correct ‘Downwind’ call, so actually called when I was turning Base.

Again the crosswind from the left threw me a little, requiring a further correction after turning Final to get correctly aligned with the runway. The second landing was a little firmer than the first, but certainly perfectly acceptable. As we climbed out from the third takeoff of the day I informed the FISO that we would be departing to the South, and set course for Lyneham.

We climbed to 3000 feet, setting the aircraft up at 24/24 as usual in the cruise. Once established on the leg from Lyneham to Frome Kev suggested I dig out the power tables in the checklist to check a few things. At 3000 feet, this showed that we were achieving 75% power at 24″ manifold pressure and 2400 RPM. Kev suggested I try the equivalent power setting with 2300 RPM, which just required a slightly higher (24.6″) manifold pressure setting. This gave us the same airspeed, but had a double benefit of slightly reducing the noise level in the cockpit, and also reducing the cost of the flight (as we pay based on tacho hours, which are directly related to the engine RPM setting).

It took us a little while to positively identify Keevil as we passed, and I maintained heading and altitude fairly well on this leg. We were listening to Bristol Radar, but didn’t really feel the need to check in with them, so just set their listening squawk onto the transponder. The heading given by SkyDemon was obviously a little off (probably due to a slightly difference between the forecast and actual wind) and we were a couple of miles to the right of Frome as we approached.

I set up a ‘direct to’ Henstridge on the 430 from our current position, and turned on to the next leg to position for our approach to Henstridge. Their website includes detailed instructions on the noise sensitive areas around them, and the best approach to their runway 07 from our current position was to make a Crosswind join. Their noise abatement diagrams helpfully indicate some useful landmarks for doing this (a couple of lakes to the North East of the airfield) and we started to look for these after checking in with them on the radio.

We initially spotted two lakes ahead, and mis-identified the airfield using these as a reference. As we continued the actual position of the airfield became must clearer, and we passed by two other lakes a lot closer in to the airfield. I did my best to follow the noise abatement procedure, but think I may have failed to fly the correct offset on the Final leg. The landing was again good, and we taxyed towards the Club buildings and parked up.

Turning Final at Henstridge

Turning Final at Henstridge

Over a hearty lunch we discussed the flying so far. Kev picked up on a few of the mistakes I’d made, most of which I put down to the long lay-off without any flying. One thing I’d meant to do in the days leading up to the flight was to read over the checklist for the aircraft, to try to get some of the regular routines back into my head. It was noticeable to me that I hadn’t done this, because I was forgetting things that should have been almost second nature. Hopefully I can get back into some regular flying and this will be less of an issue in future.

Once we’d all finished our lunch, I arranged to take advantage of the competitive fuel prices, taxying the aircraft over to the other side of the field to the bowser. The staff at the airfield couldn’t have been more helpful, driving me back over to the office to pay for the fuel, before driving the three of us back over to the aircraft ready to depart. Kev and Bronnen had taken the opportunity to go and watch the Motocross riders doing their stuff on the track adjacent to the airfield, and apparently Bronnen had shown quite an interest!

Some flying of a different kind!

Some flying of a different kind!

It was good to visit an airfield as friendly and welcoming as Henstridge. While the facilities there could perhaps do with a bit of work, the staff couldn’t have been more accommodating to us. The lunch in the cafe was freshly prepared and tasty, and one of the people manning the office even took time to take me outside and point out the two particularly noise sensitive areas after I asked for some advice on our routing after we departed. It’s certainly an airfield I’ll add to my list of destinations for future flights.

We all got back into the aircraft after I carried out a quick walkaround (including take fuel samples) and after a couple of tries the engine started and I carried out the power checks where we were parked. We then taxyed towards the runway, backtracking to the threshold after we’d checked the approach and Downwind legs were clear of other traffic. The runway at Henstridge is slightly short (about 750m) so I decided to use the flaps for takeoff. This got us airborne with plenty of runway to spare, and I retracted the gear and flaps in stages as we climbed out. I turned to depart to the South, taking care to remain inside the noise sensitive areas.

We climbed up to around 2500 feet, and set course to the South to try to find the Cerne Abbas Giant. I’d set Cerne Abbas as a turning point in SkyDemon, and as we approached we descended to around 2000 feet and began searching. Kev thought that the giant was to the South of the village, so we concentrated our search on that area, carrying out a number of orbits, and even headed down towards Dorchester to be able to pick up the road that led from there back to the village.

Sadly, despite our searching we were unable to spot it, so after a few minutes I put a ‘Direct to’ Dunkeswell in to the 430, and followed it to our next destination. On returning home I looked at our track log on Google Earth, finding that the Giant is actually slightly North of the village, and we’d passed very close by without spotting it!

Failing to spot the Cerne Abbas Giant!

Failing to spot the Cerne Abbas Giant!

Enroute to Dunkeswell

Enroute to Dunkeswell

I’d tuned to the Dunkeswell frequency just after leaving Henstridge, and we’d been hearing their transmissions clearly despite still being some 30nm from the field. They (unsurprisingly) seemed fairly busy, but as we approached things seemed to quieten down a little. Upottery was easy to spot slightly to the right of our track, and Dunkeswell soon came into view. They were operating on runway 04, which meant that a Right Base join was very easy from the direction we were approaching from. Again, the approach was relatively easy, and the landing nice and gentle. The parking area looked quite busy, so I asked the Radio operator for some advice as to where to park, before slotting in just in front of the Skydiving aircraft.

The office was busier than I’d ever seen it on previous visits, and we paid the landing fee before heading in to the restaurant for a snack and a drink. Their Sunday carvery was also proving popular, but luckily we were able to grab a table to allow us to enjoy our drink and cake in comfort. We watched the Skydive aircraft take off, but due to where we were sitting we couldn’t easily see any of the skydivers as they came back to earth.

Suitably fed and watered, we headed back to the aircraft and manhandled it into a suitable position for us to depart. Engine start was easy, but as we were taxying the rudder pedals felt slightly heavy during turns. The Arrow tends to have heavy steering, so it’s possible I had just forgotten how it feels. Kev tried a few turns and didn’t notice any real problem. We carried out our power checks on the cross runway, before waiting for another aircraft to complete a touch and go.

We backtracked to the threshold, hearing another aircraft announce they were departing from their present position. I had noticed a Chipmunk behind us on the cross runway, and wondered if he was planning to depart from the intersection (I’ve had an aircraft do this before on a visit to Dunkeswell). It transpired that it was actually a helicopter departing, we spotted him getting airborne as we turned into position at the runway threshold.

Once he was clear, I began the takeoff roll, getting airborne and setting course for a virtually straight out departure, raising the gear as normal during the climbout. As we reached our cruise altitude of around 3000 feet, I set the aircraft up for the cruise and noticed that we seemed to be going significantly slower than usual (indicating around 120 mph instead of a more normal 150 mph). Kev quizzed me as to why this might be, and I double checked that the flaps were up, all the power settings were correct, and that we were flying in balance.

It took me a long while to notice that the gear lights were still illuminated, and at first I thought I’d neglected to raise the gear. When trying to move the lever to the up position, I realised that it was already there, and then the penny dropped that Kev had probably pulled the gear circuit breaker at some point before we departed! At Kev’s prompting, I dug out the checklist and run through the drills, spotting the popped circuit breaker, but left it there at Kev’s request to complete the remainder of the checklist. Kev and I discussed our various options should this have happened for real, and I decided we would either return to Dunkeswell, or carry on to Kemble (depending on how much fuel was onboard). Our fuel burn and airspeed on the flight (should we choose to continue) would obviously be affected (airspeed being particularly relevant if we were on a flight plan, we would need to ensure ATC were aware of the change).

Still smiling despite all he'd thrown at me!

Still smiling despite all he’d thrown at me!

Once we’d worked through everything, Kev reset the circuit breaker and we raised the gear, the airspeed soon returning to a more normal cruise. We signed on with Bristol to request a Basic Service and Zone Transit between Cheddar and the Clifton Suspension Bridge. The Controller took quite a while to respond to our ‘pass your message’ response, and as I feared he came back to tell us he was not able to grant our requested routing and altitude. I was prepared to switch to our plan B (routing back via Frome and Lyneham) before he said that he could grant us clearance at 4000 feet, as long as we remained at least 1nm West of the airfield.

I gladly accepted this change to our route, and he instructed us to route via Cheddar, East Nailsea and then the Suspension Bridge at 4000 feet. We climbed up to our assigned level, and continued on to the Cheddar Reservoir. I switched back to the paper chart to get a rough feel for the headings we’d need to fly to follow the new routing, before setting course and then updating the route in SkyDemon with the new turn at East Nailsea. While doing this I allowed our height to wander somewhat, and Kev (correctly) picked me up on this as we were now in Controlled Airspace and as such required to follow the Clearance we had been given.

We got a good view of Bristol Airport as we passed, hearing the Controller pass instructions to an inbound Easyjet aircraft. Kev spotted him off in the distance to our left, but sadly he was well behind us so we weren’t able to get any good photographs. As we reached East Nailsea, I changed course to head for the Clifton Suspension Bridge, and Kev and I discussed our options should the engine fail while we were over the city of Bristol. Off to our right we had some fairly large open areas, and we also had the option of the disused airfield at Filton as we travelled further North. We got a good view of the Concorde on the ground there as we passed by, before turning again at Clifton to set course direct for Kemble.

Passing just West of Bristol Airport

Passing just West of Bristol Airport

Passing Filton, Concorde visible in the centre just below the runway

Passing Filton, Concorde visible in the centre just below the runway

As we approached the Zone boundary, I requested a frequency change from the Controller as we were now just 15nm from Kemble. This was approved, and I thanked him for his help in granting us the transit. We switched frequency to Kemble, and tried to spot the airfield in the distance. At about 12nm from Kemble I made ready to make contact with them, but Kev still had another trick up his sleeve! He reached over to the power lever, reducing power to idle announcing ‘simulated engine failure’.

We’d discussed this before the flight, so the procedure was fairly fresh in my mind. The first priority is to get the aircraft trimmed correctly to maintain best glide speed (around 100 mph) and then find an appropriate location for a forced landing. While trimming the aircraft, Kev made our initial contact with Kemble, and I spotted what looked like a good field off to our left. I managed to pick up on him announcing our current position as ‘overhead Badminton’. When he suggested I check off to the right of the aircraft, I dipped the right wing and spotted the airfield at Badminton neatly off to our right. This seemed an obvious choice as a location for us to attempt to land!

I turned towards Badminton, selected an appropriate location for our 1000 feet aiming point and then ran through the restart touch drills. I find these work easiest by using a ‘flow’ pattern, moving from left to right in the cockpit. This involves checking fuel (changing tanks), magnetos (checking both, then checking the individual mags in turn), before exercising throttle, prop, mixture, and turning on the fuel pump. Once these drills were completed, I simulated a Mayday call, and continued setting up to land.

As I turned at our 1000 feet aiming point, I felt I was probably slightly high (an issue that cropped up frequently during my training!). I started to lower the flaps, and dropped the landing gear to assist in the descent. Kev had been busy again, and the gear failed to lower, and this was perhaps my biggest slip of the day as I immediately mentally committed myself to a gear up forced landing. It was only when Kev prompted that there may be another way to lower the gear that I remembered the manual lowering mechanism. I operated this, and started to side-slip in order to increase the rate of the descent without a corresponding increase in our airspeed. As we passed around 300 feet Kev announced “Yep, we’d get in there, go around” and I applied full power, max RPM and began the go around.

I correctly raised the flaps in stages as we climbed away, but again missed an important step, which Kev highlighted by asking if we were planning to return to Kemble by road! I immediately caught his meaning, and raised the landing gear as well. Kemble was now easily visible in the difference, but I made a point of locating some other landmarks in order to ensure I wasn’t mistaking Aston Down as I had on a previous flight.  The FISO had suggested either an Overhead or Right Base join, so we set up to join Right Base and began a descent towards the airfield.

The circuit was quiet, so I slotted us in on Right Base and continued the approach. At least one thing that I can claim not to have forgotten is how to land the Arrow, as I pulled off another good landing at the end of the day, deliberately landing long so as to avoid a long taxy to the far end of the airfield. We taxyed back to Lyneham’s parking area and Kev pushed the aircraft back into its parking space while I made sure Bronnan was Ok and started packing up all the gear.

Parked up safely after a great day's flying

Parked up safely after a great day’s flying

We headed back in to the Club to settle the paperwork and carry out a final debrief. Kev went over all the issues he’d picked up on, and I resolved to spend some time with the aircraft’s checklist to try to get the various procedures back into my head to try to avoid making the same silly slips again. It’s very easy to forget important steps when they’ve not been used for several months. Hopefully I can try to get back to some more regular flying again, and make things come more naturally in future.

Tracks flown

Tracks flown

Leg 1 profile

Leg 1 profile

Leg 2 profile

Leg 2 profile

Leg 3 profile

Leg 3 profile

This turned out to be my latest ever first flight of the calendar year. Previously I’d only ever made it into February once without flying (last year) and a combination of circumstances meant that I’d almost made it to March this year! Today’s flight was very enjoyable though, and definitely much more interesting than just a ‘regular’ Currency check flight. Kev is a very knowledgeable and experienced pilot, and being an aircraft engineer he also has a lot of knowledge regarding aircraft systems that he can pass on. He’s definitely not scared of throwing in a few simulated snags during the course of a flight, and while it might be nice to have a ‘simple’ Currency check, the opportunity to practise emergency drills in the air is definitely one worth taking. Hopefully this can be my first flight of many this year, and I can take advantage of the fact that the flying fund is looking healthy due to my recent lack of flying!

Total flight time today: 2:45
Total flight time to date: 284:25

2015 Summary

December 31, 2015

A summary of my flying during 2015:

My 2015 goals were:

  • Make at least one trip to the Continent
  • Visit Caernarfon or another airfield for an extended stay
  • Continue to take part in more ‘sociable’ flying like Club fly-outs or visits to fly-ins
  • Make more use of the IMC rating to retain currency, both by carrying out flights that involve some portion in actual IMC, and carrying out both practice and real approaches into airfields that provide instrument approaches
  • Consider the addition of a Night Qualification to my license.
  • Reach the 200 hours P1 mark to enable me to carry out ‘Charity Flights’, initially for the PTA at Catrin’s school.

Regrettably, flying to the Continent still eludes me, although I did get to the point of fully planning and preparing for a flight to France with David, only to be foiled by a stomach bug of some sort the night before the flight. Using an aircraft as a means of transport for an extended stay somewhere also didn’t happen, although I did at least act as ‘Dad’s Taxi‘ service to take Catrin up to Caernarfon to visit family earlier in the year.

I also flew over 2 hours in real IMC this year, most notably on flights to Haverfordwest and Land’s End, where I elected to deliberately fly in cloud in order to brush up on the rusty IMC skills. I only completed a single approach during the year though, which is a little disappointing.

Kemble is now equipped for night flying, although only stays open late one night per week (currently Thursday). As such, the Night Qualification would still really just be a ‘box ticking’ exercise, rather than a rating that could actually be useful to me.

The Charity flight I carried out actually took me over the 200 hours P1 mark, which meant I would then be able to offer further flights without having to gain explicit permission from the CAA. However, not long after completing this flight, the CAA changed the guidelines so as to remove this requirement!

Particularly enjoyable were the multi leg flights I flew with Kev, David, Charlie and David again. These four days of flying amounted to a total of 12:35, just about half of the total number of hours flown in the whole year! It would be great to be able to make more flights such as these in the coming year, taking advantage of having another pilot alongside to either share the flying or just act as a knowledgeable passenger.

The main feature of this year was a real lack of consistent flying. Although this year’s hours flown was only a couple lower than last year, I needed to fly 5 Club currency checks (RAF Lyneham Flying Club’s rules require me to fly at least every 60 days, otherwise a check flight is needed). As such this meant that I had a number of short bursts of flying activity, each punctuated by fairly long breaks inbetween. There was no single reason for this, merely a combination of circumstances that prevented me from flying as often as I would have liked. The year has ended in much the same way, meaning that my first flight of 2016 is likely to be yet another currency check. Hopefully I can make this the only one I require next year!

Goals for next year (sadly, very similar to this year’s goals!)

  • Make at least one trip to the Continent
  • Visit Caernarfon or another airfield for an extended stay
  • Take part in more ‘sociable’ flying like Club fly-outs or visits to fly-ins
  • Make more use of the IMC rating to retain currency, both by carrying out flights that involve some portion in actual IMC, and carrying out both practice and real approaches into airfields that provide instrument approaches
  • Fly more consistently and regularly, reducing the need for frequent currency checks

Total flying hours: 281:40
Hours P1: 206:50